1. p Honolulu!
    1. AR00010371
  2. WATIR TAN I4 \
  3. \--" 11214•1 '21: ?
      1. cARS ? g-ziqw0,
  4. .1 ? :* • ?
  5. Next Stop Honolulu!
  6. Introduction
  7. Chapters
  8. AR00010376
  9. Regular Disratell Line
  10. i SAN FRANCISCO
    1. HAWAIIAN PACKET LINE
  11. CHAPTER ONE
  12. ... from sailor to trainman
  13. AR00010377
  14. within a year horn the pausing* of the of the fo franchise. vantioia,
    1. AR00010380
  15. SALMON
      1. ANDERSON & LUNDY,
  16. Dentists.
    1. AR00010381
      1. DAILY inTizinur: ITO.Y01.1.111.7, H. T.. SEPTEMBER 8, 1369.
      2. s in
  17. AR00010384
      1. flaw
      2. t and 'esent been )ain's a, 123 flrias &rig blued is, a what )assen vs.
  18. IIIIERCIAL ADVERTISER, DIG-
      1. dead and..." ru101 --
    1. AR00010385
      1. DAILY BULLETIN: HONOLULTJ, IL L, 2 , 101 7 22411101t 18, 1889.
  19. S50 REWARD A
  20. Ulm IOW & la Co.
      1. OtThursday Eyening, Nov. 21
  21. THE RAY BROS.,
    1. Australian Comedians.
  22. OUR CUV'NORS I
      1. : untrue. lard 'gee- will stop steamers Ike since will ma- im
      2. 'rickets Limited to 100 at $2.50
  23. NOTICE.
  24. i titt li
  25. H RAILWAY AND
  26. LAND Co.
    1. AR00010388
      1. als t,885 00 — —
  27. • -- 279 75 _—
  28. alub
      1. 28th.
  29. GREAT LAND SALE
  30. PEA RL CITY,
  31. Saturday, Nov. 29th.
      1. "MI Aboard for Pearl City!"
  32. FOR SA LE ---
  33. OR&L's Own Development: Pearl City ...
    1. AR00010391
  34. I II°
  35. ? I SIAN D OF
  36. ITLY 2, 1894. Homes at Pearl City!
  37. The Water Supply is Ample.
  38. AR00010393
  39. John Aloysius Hughes Master Car Builder
  40. EARLY DAYS
  41. Y JOHN H UGHES IN PEARL
      1. MIK Wall • MU 24, 1936
    1. ki.F A century ago
      1. mored place. 'Twas in
      2. a at Pearl Harbor the God kept rendezvous ade his home.
  42. miles there will soon be an- chorage and safety for our satire fleet. * *
  43. * * *
      1. In the early 90's, Pearl
      2. nose men were the pio.
      3. every country in Europe, in-
      4. a conquistadore from the
      5. through the Leleihua Pass
      6. from the direction of Weis-
      7. enemy in platoons.
      8. Two member. of the com- pany are still alive and still live at Pearl City.
  44. * * *
      1. It was a tragic event that marred the beauty and soli.
      2. The. other leper, surren. dere', a few days after the death of his friend.
      3. On the morning that he was taken from Pearl City to Honolulu. extra ears had to
      4. I saw him, young and alert march through the greeting
      5. rapid stride and with head
      6. erect, like the victor in a
      7. hand to trim a few straggling hairs — an almost invisible
  45. am n fell. * 4 *
      1. the islands. The election of our del*.
      2. not my choice; if you will nominate a good man I will vote for him."
      3. duly seconded and then a ma
      4. nations close. The Ewa peo-
      5. arose and nominated Jim Tor. hert. Torbert lived in Pearl
      6. turmoil and a bitterness I
      7. doing here?" I told him. "Why!" he said, "the man-
      8. In 1905, cholera in a mild
      9. The sentinel at Red Hill
      10. iesty, n the f the at of Ir. I ly of
      11. l'ileGrew's residence on Pearl
      12. 1111 EMI will give them a ticket
      13. ticket for that hour. Six ears will
      14. twenty 1, ? dollar,'
  46. offered ?
      1. by MOIL
      2. THE DAILY
      3. . fe•
    1. rLU, U. L, NOVEMBER 15, 1
      1. J U I./
  47. , op
      1. • Boo
  48. Ewa Courthouse!
      1. On New Year's Day, Jan, i s '90
  49. BREW Co. No. 1. T
      1. I 1 of
    1. AR00010398
  50. COMM MCI A.L ADVERTISER NOVEMBER 25, 1889.
  51. Hardl
  52. HOUS
  53. FOlt 1890-01.
      1. psi°
      2. 0. R. 1.?5 L. CO.
    1. To Ewa Plantation!
      1. ON SATURDAY, SEPT. 13th
      2. 014 . 11 1"1
  54. 61-7 ammismiam il
  55. tate t r o ie r Butter, Butter, Butter,
      1. .c.,
      2. 010**• ? 0 ". 1 " 110 "
      3. Xdvertuttatais.
    1. HATI.T'S PATENT
      1. TINE TABLE:
      2. Honolulu ? to I
  56. AR00010399
  57. IN TEN YEARS
      1. What Has Been Done By the
      2. THIS IS AN ANNIVERSARY
      3. Appeals to Those or Little
  58. thanynio ov
  59. CHAPTER TWO ... miles and miles of track
  60. • .. .: 1 . h.r. ' ? , ..'. ' 1-F.P..14' - .1".. ?
  61. _ - ' ?
      1. .t. - • pm
  62. • •-• • Ift a ?
      1. Ar Waianae ? .... 10:54 .... 6:49
  63. .411 ?
  64. TO WAIANAE.
      1. 2nd Class, ? 1 25
  65. ILANIWAI BATHS.
  66. Y1 HI
  67. 41' ?
  68. IS. ? 2s. Ale at ? Alt.' ,I , o .::. ?
  69. ... ?
  70. The Rugged Waianae Coast
  71. OBSERVATION CAR
    1. Round trip, including lunch
  72. ROSA Sit CO
      1. Chaise Win* Woofs mid Nan
  73. SUMMER RATES
      1. Or the Waialua Hotel?
  74. DINNER DANCE
  75. TONIGHT
      1. Ewa Sugar Mill, Oahu.
  76. ON TO WAIALUA
    1. Tracklaying on the Exten-
    2. sion From Waianae.
      1. LOCOMOTIVE WHISTLE SIGNALS
  77. CHAPTER FOUR ... pineapples aboard
  78. CHAPTER FIVE ... cargoes along the route
  79. I.:sDAY. JANUARY 5. 181
      1. ANOTHER NEW ENTERPRISE .
      2. scribed for the scheme. When
      3. Every Day, Except Sunday.
  80. AR00010452
      1. tNo. of
  81. CHILD SAVED
  82. FROM DEATH
  83. BY BRAKEMAN
    1. Climbs to Front of En- gine and Makes Heroic
    2. Rescue
      1. beam to see what r could do, /Jut
  84. Railroad Hero
  85. I MOW II III ?
  86. - ?
  87. AR00010456
  88. D - 28365
  89. (2)Biles 28365
      1. D 4116;30
      2. GOOD FOR ONE TRIP
  90. 0. R.
    1. . CO. co
  91. :Railway ef. eand Co. —
    1. Oahu
  92. NT 77074
  93. N20 77074
  94. HONOLULU ? 0
  95. RAILWAY D
  96. (2) 2865
  97. Transportation D2835
  98. D 28365
  99. D 28365
  100. D 28365
    1. CHAIR CAR
  101. HONOLULU ar id. CO.
    1. O. R. lir L. CO.
      1. EWA MILL f z2. 4 4, . /4
    2. u,.. Sz .L. CO. 0)
    3. D ZtViti5
  102. L. CO.,
  103. 0. R. az L. CO.
  104. WAIPAHU 0 MAIKTJAL.
      1. O.Th &L. CO.
  105. CHAPTER SIX
  106. Passengers & Timetables ...
      1. hewer
      2. 2711.02
    1. FIRST CLASS
  107. AT BOUND TRAINS
    1. 18 ? 34
  108. 9 3.40
      1. It v Arrive ,
      2. 10.43 10.34 510.26
    1. Wahiawa T
  109. STATIONS
      1. Honolulu .... T Damon .... T
      2. Ewa Mill . ..T Gilbert . . .
      3. • Kawaihapai ? Mokuleia Puuiki . T Waialua . .T
    1. Waimea . . T
      1. 62.5 61.3 60.4 T 59.6
      2. 64.91 ? 8.20 ? 315.15
      3. 16 ? 10
      4. 71 12.30
  110. natty except Deer -
      1. 9,44 ? 7.07 f
  111. 9.39 6.58 6.56 6.62 9.30 6.46
      1. 26 ? ao
  112. 12.15 ... 2. 0 24 .
      1. 14 ? 49
      2. FIRST CLASS
      3. SECON D (ASS
  113. WEST BOUND TRANS
  114. 13 --
      1. 32 8,43 1
      2. 17 ? 21 ? 37
      3. 4 8.36
    1. 8.54
      1. 0.0 W - Honolulu ....T
      2. 1 1 0 0 9775 . .. : 8 0 Waiau 2 19159 . 11 . 1. : Kalauao
      3. W i Pearl City T
      4. 171 W ? Quarry ....T
      5. 22.4 W _ Dole Siding T 23.7 ? Castner ....T
      6. 2 2 '5 3 . . ? . Castner ....T
      7. 7 8 W ? ? Leilehua ....T
      8. Wahiawa . T
    2. 14.2 ? Hos.eae ? ....
      1. Mokuleia .... Puuiki ....T
      2. 54.9 W ? Waialua ...T
      3. 70.4 ? . . Waimea .. T
      4. 12 5.15
      5. swimeimeinse 83.10
      6. 3 ? 25
      7. 10 9.5
  115. STATIONS
  116. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
      1. (b) Speed of trains between Oahu Sugar Company's Mill and Pump No. 1 and
  117. 41 VA) tt*
  118. TRAINS
  119. SAFETY
  120. COMFORT
  121. ECONOMY
  122. BUSES ? TRAINS
      1. POINTS OF INTEREST
      2. TIME TABLE ? FARES
  123. OAHU
  124. (Subject to Change RAILWAY
    1. COMBINATION RAIL AND BUS TRIP TO
  125. HALEIWA
  126. $2.45
  127. The Best Trip on the Island
  128. of Oahu at the Lowest Fare
      1. A Comfortable and Safe Journey
  129. BUSES
    1. THE STORY OF HAWAII AS TOLD
    2. THRU YOUR EYES
  130. 3.14 3.17 ?
  131. 4.38 ?
  132. PUULOA HONOLULU 0 6
  133. AIEA ??
    1. .. ? ...
    2. 9 8 6
      1. WAIANAE ? 32
  134. FKAWAIHAPAI F MAKUA ? ? 40
  135. TRAINS
    1. FOR SIGHTSEEING
  136. TRAINS '
  137. F HOWE ?
  138. PEAR'. CITY ?
  139. TI2 AIN FARES
  140. PITUIKI ?
  141. WATERTOWN .......... ?
  142. $ .30 ?
  143. BUSES
  144. HONOLULU TO HALEIWA ? HALEIWA TO HONOLULU
  145. Via Schofield Barracks ? Via Schofield Barracks
  146. BUS FARES
      1. Schofield ? P. 0.
  147. Haleiwa ?
      1. [Buses
  148. McComb Gate ?
  149. Field Art. Area ?
  150. Wahiawa ?
  151. CHAPTER SEVEN
  152. s ocl00000wing down
    1. 0. R. & L. TAXI SERVICE
  153. PRIZES
  154. Make Your Reservations
  155. for the
    1. A 110 Mile Special Train trip to out-of athe-way
    2. LUNCHEON
  156. Camera Train Carries 500
  157. For Photo Fans All Day Sunday
  158. .(: I'mera -- Train'
  159. Leaves Sunday
      1. ENROUTE TO HALEIWA—SUNDAY, JULY 16, 1939
  160. - SENATOF1 HOTEL
  161. Iltfr LOVE YOU ALL
  162. AT THE
    1. wanted at
      1. RIVERSIDE GRILL
  163. Railroad Brakemen Wanted
    1. Also firemen, track
      1. workers, truck help-
      2. Apply
      3. Employment Office
  164. Oahu Railway &Land Company
    1. Motorcycle
  165. Messenger
    1. PEAR L HA R
      1. OPERATES RAILROAD
      2. Favorite GI Dance Spots
  166. WHERE ?
  167. 1380 A&N CLUB ?
      1. VISIT A SUGAR
  168. tr.r,..tte= TAVERN
  169. Closed Sumloys. PEARL CITY
  170. DANCING
  171. Except Swedes) I:30 to 4830 DAILY
      1. ICE SKATING AT WAHIAWAll
    1. ARCTIC ICE SKATING RINK
  172. — 7/
  173. Railway Now Joins Waialua, Wahiawa
      1. • ND 0 to Waipahu ? All rail
      2. to go
      3. Company A of the 34th En- ", gineers were assigned to the job
      4. Ir. they would build the entire proj-
  174. KURUSU BLUNTLY WARNED NATION READY FOR BATTLE
  175. URGENT -:- WARNING -:- URGENT
  176. While this raid is only make-believe, COMPLETELY.
      1. do your part in this rehearsal
      2. for an event we hope will never come.
  177. "OUTBLACK THE LAST BLACKOUT"
  178. NAINGET
  179. "PANAGSIPNGET KABUSOR" PAKAUNA
  180. RAOTEN NAINGET
      1. Sapanese May Strike Over Weekend!
  181. ' FOP
  182. SECRET
  183. Ready To Haul The Night Shift To Work
  184. Oahu Railway & Land Company
    1. P. H. —Ft. Kam — Hickam
  185. KALANIANAOLE PARK
  186. B. F. DILLINGHAM MAY HAVE DREAMED OF ROLL-ON
  187. ROLL-OFF
  188. CARGO
      1. Handling of cargo would be reduced to a minimum, shipping costs would there.
      2. of Hawaii.
      3. transportation.
  189. OAHU RAILWAY ? AND LAND COMPANY
  190. AR00010508
  191. TIME TABLE
  192. HIBISCUS
  193. HELICONIA short line RAILROAD
  194. "Tatiete4overojefte 4(4944 eaceueity ilteet itooliete to Ho Mee
  195. Malting ? Chauncey ? W.
  196. 0*6006 ?
  197. 7 1 \
  198. The Dillingham's Private Parlor Car
  199. OR&L's rolling stock
  200. OR&L LOCOMOTIVE No. 10 OR&L LOCOMOTIVE No. 12
  201. AR00010521
  202. OR&L I 0( NK ? 4NTO. 83
  203. OR&L LOCOMOTIVE No. 88 OR&L LOCOrvIOTIVE No. 90
  204. OR&L MOTOR CAR M-4 OR&L MOTOR CAR M-5
  205. .e >
  206. OAHU IR A I L.W AI(
      1. 1900 1901
  207. AR00010552
  208. • Nr. ? * S Q : b ? 4 /
    1. \ ? /4
  209. 1,545,1144.:47. 1:1: 1 0 134 :7 .? [ ... 7 4 9 • 71 : '4114: 1 1 ? //
      1. ..., /
  210. KAPALAMA BASIN
  211. Narrow Gauge in Paradise: 2-8-0 No. 36 takes on watr =- vif-Lmahli

p Honolulu!
The Story of the Oahu RAway & Land Company
AR00010369

About This Book
Benjamin Franklin Dillingham
fell off a rented
horse, and the history of modern Hawail was changed
forever. Dillingham was a New Englander, born on Cape
Cod in 1844, and he went to sea at the age of 14. After a
series of adventures, and rapid advancement, he landed in
Honolulu as first mate aboard the bark
Whistler
in 1864.
He was 20. After breaking his leg in the topple from the
horse, he was carried to the American Marine Hospital in
Nu'uanu to heal. The
Whistler
sailed without him, and
Dillingham was an ex-seafaring man, ashore for good.
After recuperating, he found work at a local hardware
store. An entreprenurial spirit bubbled within, and in a
few years he had borrowed some money and was its owner.
He also married a missionary daughter and started a
family. Frank Dillingham's businesses —the hardware
operation and later a large dairy—struggled with heavy
obligations for decades, and he was constantly searching
for a 'big score' that would eradicate his debts and provide
for his family.
That score was the Oahu Railway & Land Company,
a narrow-gauge operation that established sugar as a
phenomenally profitable crop on Crahu. The primary line
headed west from the main station in downtown Hono-
lulu, eventually stitching together sugar plantations in
Aiea, Waipahu, 'Ewa, Wai`anae, Waialua, and Kahuku. A
later branch wending its way to the center of the Island
served the pineapple growers around Wahiawa.
For almost sixty years—from 1889 to 1947-0R8d,
trundled both freight and passengers around the island,
creating great fortunes not only for the Dillinghams, but
for many others as well.
This book is the story of that line.
AR00010370

AR00010371
3- CARS
NAT°
• *,
BROWNS COW SWAM
C4ww1.14a1N•41,••
• Cs
LEG END
Nom
Indicates approeimate area of Cane land
Intimates approsarnale area of Pineapple land
indicates 0.
R & I...
CO. Tracks
14-1444
Indicates Plardation Tracks
cam
Indicates Koolau
Railway
Tracks
It•
K
pil
l
SWAN _ILS
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.
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WAIALua Cam,
SNCTIoNSI
NM 7 &
COmenLID
FROM
ALL MAILABLE
DATA FOR
RAILRoAD PuBPOSES ONLY
WASMNIGION
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Next
Stop Honolulu!
Oahu Railway & Land Company
1 889-1 97 1
AR0001 0372

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Next Stop Honolulu!
Oahu Railway & Land Company
1889-1971
by
Jim Chiddix & MacKinnon Simpson
Sugar Cane Press
AR00010373

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Introduction
This book is the culmination of an interest spanning well over half my life.
I arrived in Hawai`i in 1971 to join a college friend in a job crewing on
Seraphim,
a charter
sailboat based at Poka`i Bay, in Wai`anae, on 0`ahu's leeward coast. That business soon went
broke, but I was determined to stay in the Islands, and found a job as a technician with the tiny
cable TV company serving the rural Wai`anae Coast, an area otherwise without reception. As I
followed cable lines up and down every country road, I became aware of the narrow gauge
railroad tracks which led up the coastline and into a broad valley which was home to the
Lualualei Naval Ammunition Depot. Residents explained that during the Vietnam War, Navy
trains had hauled ordnance from the depot to ships in the West Loch arm of Pearl Harbor, and
that, years earlier, a privately owned railroad had steamed up the coast from Honolulu and
around rocky Ka`ena Point to the North Shore of the island. Further investigation revealed that
the Hawaiian Railway Society was restoring locomotives in a borrowed equipment facility at
the Depot, as well as publishing newsletters recounting the history of the original rail line,
Oahu Railway & Land Company.
My fledgling career consumed most of my time, as I first became manager of that little cable
TV system, and then chief engineer for the larger Oceanic Cable system in Honolulu. Oceanic
eventually wired the entire island and absorbed the smaller operations, including my original
employer. I spent fifteen years on 0`ahu, working in cable and starting an electronics manufac-
turing company. I often visited the Hawaiian Railway Society, which had moved from Lualualei
to the sugar mill town of 'Ewa, not far from Pearl Harbor. My interest was less in restoring old
equipment, however, than in the history of what I came to realize had been a very sophisticated
railroad operation and a central part of life on 0`ahu for more than half a century. I felt a
kinship with the people, especially the engineers, who had built a vital network for island
commerce nearly a century before my own efforts to construct a different kind of network
across the same geography.
I began collecting information on the Oahu Railway—and narrow gauge railroads in gen-
eral—in the mid-seventies. These included the Society's monthly newsletter,
Akahele I Ke Ka`ahi,
as well as the few books written about Hawaiian railroads, most now long out of print. As my
career moved my wife and me from Honolulu to Colorado, Connecticut, and Manhattan, we
returned to Hawai`i as often as possible to see friends and to visit Oceanic Cable, as I worked
until recently for its parent company, Time Warner. A feature of these visits was almost always
a trip to the Bishop Museum, where I'd poke through the archived files of the Dillingham
Corporation and other collections of photos, maps and documents about OR&L. I purchased
copies of some of the photographs, and displayed them in my office and home, and I began
plans for a model railroad depicting the Oahu Railway. I constructed my first OR&L layout in
our basement in Connecticut, but had to dismantle it when we moved. A more ambitious
layout is now underway in our Colorado home. I built and purchased a collection of locomo-
tives and cars along the lines of those on OR&L in 0n3 scale, 1/4" to the foot. The many
similarities with the Colorado narrow gauge lines of the Denver, Rio Grande & Western Rail-
road, very popular with modelers, made this task much easier.
The Oahu Railway is a surprisingly good prototype for a model railroad. It was constrained
in size by its island location, had only one major and a few minor branch lines, and hauled a
Iv
variety of goods. Its economic reasons for being were, of course, transporting raw sugar from
the six mills it served to the docks, and moving huge loads of pineapples from the pine sidings
in the fields of the island's central plain to the canneries. But the railroad was also a fixture of
the community, with frequent passenger service, including connections with branch routes. It
hauled garbage to the dump, south seas guano fertilizer to plantations, coral concrete to con-
struction sites, empty cans to three canneries and full ones to the docks, landfill to lagoons,
merchandise to general stores, oil and gasoline and on and on. Prior to and during World War
II, it hauled guns to batteries, ammunition to bases, depots and ships, and soldiers and sailors
downtown to the bars, tattoo parlors and dance halls of Hotel Street.
OR&I2s locomotives ranged from small and simple to unusually heavy and powerful for a
narrow gauge operation. It included a sophisticated automatic block signaling system, probably
the only American narrow gauge railroad to have one. Trains could, and did, run on as little as
five-minute intervals. And it had a beautiful passenger terminal in Honolulu, and a large and
active roundhouse. The modeling possibilities are endless.
For a long time, my research into the OR&I2s history was focused on planning my model
railroad, but it eventually dawned on me that there might be interest in a book offering a
comprehensive pictorial history of the railroad and its place in Island life. I know that there are
many current and former Hawail residents with a keen interest in the history of that unique
place. I know as well that there is an audience that reads and collects railroad history books.
And my own modeling experience hinted that others might enjoy a collection of useful infor-
mation about this wonderful line.
The idea of writing a book led me into conversations with Mac Simpson, a noted Hawail
historian and an old friend who had authored and designed a number of illustrated books with
Hawaiian themes, including
Streetcar Days in Honolulu
(2001) ,
a history of the Honolulu Rapid
Transit Company. Ocahu is a very small island in many ways. Mac had often worked with my
former next-door-neighbor, the late Bob Goodman, who founded both Island Heritage Press
and Beyond Words, along the way publishing some 120 books, mostly about Hawai`i. He and
Mac pioneered the composition, layout and publication of high quality books using Macintosh
computers in 1986, a technique that came to be called "desktop publishing." Their first effort,
a richly illustrated history of HawaiTs whaling days called
WhaleSong,
created an enormous stir
in the computer industry. Bob and Mac probably sold more copies of
WhaleSong
to aspiring
computer publishers than to whaling aficionados, and the book featured an extensive "how we
did it" section which provided a tutorial on this new approach to publishing.
Chats with Mac over the years opened my eyes to the practical possibility of publishing the
dedicated history that the OR&L deserved. And conversations with various folks in the rail-
road publishing and modeling communities confirmed that there was at least a vague awareness
that there had once been an interesting railroad on 0`ahu, and that there was a genuine interest
in knowing more. Mac and I decided to collaborate on this book, and hope that it pleases its
various audiences. It is indeed a labor of love.
Jim Chiddix
Evergreen, Colorado
V
ARnnni
m74

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Chapters
111
1 11 1
11 1 1
1
11
1 11
11 11
1 11
111111 11
11111 11
1 11M
CH 01
CH 02
CH 03
CH 04
CH 05
CH 06
CH 07
CH 08
CH 09
CH 10
... from sailor to trainman
... miles and miles of track
... sweet gold of sugar
... pineapples aboard
... cargoes along the route
... passengers & timetables
sl000000000wing down
... a wartime railroad
... the end of the line
... railroading resurrected
10
58
100
138
152
166
184
198
256
272
"r=dAiRiil
DEDICATIONS • JIM CHIDDIX
My father, Max E. Chiddix, and grandfather, John C. Chiddix, scientists both,
who taught me to observe and explain the way the world works.
Kenneth F. Brown, descendent of
alri,
a Hawaiian businessman and philosopher,
who helped me appreciate the sweep of Island history, and started me on a
career in cable television.
The late Frederick A. Schaefer III, a
kama'aina
whose grandfather was one of the
first sugar planters to use a steam locomotive to haul cane from his Honoka`a
fields. As my first real boss, Fred taught me a lot about how a real business works.
The late Gene Piety, Wai`anae cable TV entrepreneur and engineer. Gene taught
me the risks and rewards of being a technology visionary.
Most of all to my loving, cheerful wife Trudy, who is tolerant and supportive of
my enthusiasms and interests.
DEDICATIONS • MacKINNON SIMPSON
Bob Goodman—HawaiTs best publisher ever ... my mentor and friend ... a man
of ideas and sharing ... lover of all things Hawaiian ... a creative ground-shaker
whose many talents changed the art of publishing forever.
Laura and Pinky Thompson—Honest, caring, committed, visionary ... two of
my heroes, who helped shape Hawai`i, and whose quiet contributions will affect
Hawaiian generations (and HawaiTs generations) far into the future.
Noreen Valente- My friend and alter-ego, who has helped unselfishly in project
after project, often by anchoring my balloon of creativity when it threatens to
soar uncontrollably into space.
PUBLISHER:
Sugar Cane Press
P.O. Box 161201
Honolulu, Hawai`i 96816
Unless otherwise noted, text and images are
copyright 2004 Sugar Cane Press
All rights reserved. No part of this book may
be reproduced or transmitted in any form or
by any
means,
electronic, mechanical, digital
including photocopying, recording, or by any
information storage and retreival system, without
written permission of the publisher, except as
permitted by law.
Library of Congress Catalog
Card Number 20041109
7 6
ISBN: 0-9 -
06213-1-0
Hard cover trade edition
Printed in Hong Kong
First trade edition, September 2004
Appendix
OR&L Locomotives
... car roster
... year-by-year ... the annual reports
... acknowledgements
bibliograhy
... index
286
334
340
348
350
351
Cover image: Original by John Hugh Coker
?
Above:
An early gasoline speeder cruising in Waranae.
vi
?
vii
AR00010375

Preface
Benjamin Franklin Dillingham fell off a rented horse, and the history of modern
Hawai`i was changed forever. Dillingham was a New Englander, born on Cape
Cod in 1844, and he went to sea at the age of 14. After a series of adventures, and
rapid advancement, he landed in Honolulu as first mate aboard the bark
Whistler
in 1864. He was 20. After breaking his leg in the topple from the horse, he was
carried to the American Marine Hospital in Nu'uanu to heal. The
Whistler
sailed
without him, and Dillingham was an ex-seafaring man, ashore for good.
After recuperating, he found work at a local hardware store. An entreprenurial
spirit bubbled within, and in a few years he had borrowed some money and was
its owner. He also married a missionary daughter and started a family. Frank
Dillingham's businesses—the hardware operation and later a large dairy—struggled
with heavy obligations for decades, and he was constantly searching for a 'big
score' that would eradicate his debts and provide for his family.
That score was Oahu Railway
8c
Land Company, a narrow-gauge operation that
established sugar as a phenomenally profitable crop on 0`ahu. The primary line
headed west from the main station in downtown Honolulu, eventually stitching
together sugar plantations in Aiea, Waipahu, 'Ewa, Wai`anae, Waialua, and Kahuku.
A later branch wending its way to the center of the Island served the pineapple
growers around Wahiawa.
For almost sixty years—from 1889 to 1947-0R&L trundled both freight and
passengers around the island, creating great fortunes not only for the Dillinghams,
but for many others as well.
This book is the story of that line.
V1LL

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AR00010376

•)1- 0
4'•
4 1K•
1
/ 1314%,404.%•21+,41 ,
Nr•V•IvIt/AKV,^A•P.OPAIMP•Mt.t.V.VmvItiv.•
.y.m.y.kejtmw,ivimilliAmilli4
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.1,11)!
nliiMilMairtiMITIMPIMORSIZEMMEEMEM
r•
The Picturesque Oahu railway. There are daily trains from Honolulu
to the beautiful Haleiwa Hotel, and to Leilehua. Also combined auto
and rail trips around the island through the Wahiawa pineapple fields,
with a stay at Haleiwa. $10 covers all expenses of this two-day trip.
10
Jx DOMITILA.
, mit
PAIIIICUTABI s# POBTIRRIL
I
.•— ?
• •••• •• ? • •••• •••••••• ••••
?

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Regular Disratell Line
Vo

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i SAN FRANCISCO
WIN A I IMMO; DARE
Whistler
CONRIODO It E JO UN BAT Y.
W ?
Instee•Clate Dispatch.
F. Mild* War
APO./ le
ILACICULD
410. ?
&pots.
•••••••• ?
HAWAIIAN PACKET LINE

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CHAPTER ONE

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... from sailor to trainman
Benjamin Franldin Dillingham went to sea at 14,
not an unusual choice—or age—for a farm boy from
New England. Perhaps it was in his blood, as his father
had made the same decision as a young man.
Dillingham was bright, disciplined and hard-
working, three traits worthy of rapid advancement, then
or now. While still a teenager, he circled the globe,
visited exotic ports of call, and even became an unwitting
prisoner of war.
Above:
The clipper ship Southern Cross.
On June 6, 1863, he was the nineteen-year-old third
mate on the clipper ship
Southern Cross
bound for New
York with a cargo of "log wood" when the heavily-armed
Confederate raider
CSS Florida
appeared. British-built,
the
Florida
was iron-hulled and powered by both sail and
steam.
As a disguise, her smokestacks were even collapsible.
The
Southern Cross
was becalmed, her sails flapping, so
there was no hope of escape. On this day
Florida
was
flying the British ensign, though as she steamed closer,
she ran up the rebels' "stars and bars." A squad of armed
Confederate sailors boarded and took Dillingham and
the rest of the clipper's small crew prisoner. Then, as the
new prisoners watched from the deck of their captor, the
Southern Cross
was set ablaze and sunk.
According to a memoir that Frank Dillingham
penned years later, discipline was lax aboard the captor
ship:
At the time of our transfer to the
Florida,
Captain
Moffitt was so much under the influence of liquor
that he was unable to walk the deck without losing
his equilibrium. The usual disciple of naval ships
was sadly wanting.
One night Dillingham loosed his handcuffs and
briefly considered taking control of the
Florida
but
reason prevailed when he realized that his thirteen
men—the other twelve still in shackles—would be
facing the 325 men of the
Florida.
Eventually they
were put ashore at Rio de Janerio and worked their
way back to the war-torn United States.
Dillingham headed west, determined to take up
residence in San Francisco and find work ashore. An
unsuccessful hunt for employment led him back to
the sea, and in 1865 he was hired by Captain John
Paty as first mate on the bark
Whistler,
on the San
Francisco/Honolulu run.
!A brief sojurn in the city enabled me to realize
that I had no training in any other vocation, save
that of the sea, and learning that Capt. Paty of the
bark
Whistler
plying between the coast and
Honolulu was in need of officers, I applied and
obtained the position of
first mate without delay"
1 1

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AR00010377

Fr The Hairallan bark Eterstord, hence lo DO.
cember lest, for Bremen, wind at that port on the
4th of May. Mon John &ski* nod
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Above:
The original location of Dillingham 6 Co. on King Street. Frank Dillingham has been identified as third from the right
13
Paty was already well renowned in the Pacific.
Kamehameha III made him a Commodore in 1846, and
Paty had later claimed Laysan and Lisiansky Islands,
both Northwest of the main archipelago, for the King-
dom. Dillingham wrote that he felt at home the first
time he came ashore in Honolulu:
After my tempstuous experiences in rounding Cape
Horn and the Cape of Good Hope, the trip seemed
to me like a pleasure excursion. It felt as i f I had
anchored in a home port; the cordiality I experi-
encedftom all those whom I met removed at once
the feeling of being in a foreign land though the
streets were filled with several nationalities. The
luxuriant foliage, the balmy breezes, the tropical
fruits, all afforded such delights that I ftlt sure I
should return.
He would indeed return, and on his third trip
aboard the
Whistler,
he rented a horse. "Sailors are
notoriously unfamiliar with horses" he later wrote—
describing his collision with a carriage. Ships and sailors
were of economic import in the Islands, and on July 29,
1865, the
Pacific Commercial Advertiser
ran a short piece
on his accident:
-
ny of parting 10.
?
.oda Burdett.,
7vito
?
-
bee been so closer/WI, popuier during hie see.
sloe ea 'be routs, but It is s eonselstIon to know the;
his plea is to be so ably tilled.
glr The lirst dicer of the bark
II:huller,
Mr
Dillingham, whose leg wee broken last Friday night
by being thrown frets e horse, in collision with a
ca
mas, pa the valley read, Is now at ths Amerloas
mar
k
s
Hoppitol, where be receives every care sad
attention, and is In a favorable condition for rotes.
The
WhistlerWhistler
could not wait and sailed without him.
While recovering, Dillingham had a long time to reflect
upon his options. This time he was more serious about
staying ashore. Already in love with these Islands, he had
met Emma Louisa Smith on an earlier visit. Despite
apochryphal tales of her nursing him back to health, she
was away in New England while Frank was recuperating.
She was also engaged to another man whom by all
accounts she did not love. Dillingham's patience in
slowly courting Emma demonstrated a determination for
which he later became known.
12
Above:
A portrait of young Benjamin Franklin
Dillingham. He wrote on the back that it was taken in
1860 or 1862 (making him either 16 or 18). Note the
embossed patriotic slogan on the leather frame: "The Union
Now and Forever."
He accepted a job as a clerk in a hardware store
called H. Dimond & Son for $40 per month. The store
was owned by Henry Dimond, formerly a bookbinder in
the Seventh Missionary Company. In 1850 he had been
released from his duties at the Mission and had gone into
business with his son.
Meanwhile Dillingham turned down a tempting
offer to captain the
Whistler
on a voyage 'round the Horn
to New Bedford, Massachusetts. It would have been very
rewarding financially and given him a chance to see his
family, but would have taken upwards of a year. He
turned it down. Frank Dillingham was ashore for good.
He worked hard for "Father" Dimond and by 1869
was offered the chance to buy out the concern for
$28,000, the cost of the inventory. As a born entrepre-
neur, Frank agreed, but of course did not have the money.
What he did have, which was almost as good, was a
contact with Alfred Castle, then working for the King-
dom. Castle's father was Samuel Northrup Castle, who
had arrived in 1837 with the Eighth Company to work
in the Mission's business office. He and Amos Starr
Cooke had later formed the mercantile firm of Castle &
Cooke. Mr. Castle, of course,
did
have access to $28,000,
an enormous sum of money in those days.
The two young men became partners in the venture,
and—with S.N. Castle's guarantee—they borrowed half
the money from Charles R. Bishop's bank and gave
Dimond notes for the other half. The new company was
to be called Dillingham & Co. It was an enormous risk,
especially in HawaiTs fragile economy. But just a decade
before, Dillingham had been a 14-year-old scampering
up the rigging of the tall ship
Southern Cross.
He was well
used to risks.
In his personal life, Frank had finally connected with
Emma Smith. Her parents, Reverend Lowell and Abigail
Smith, were members of the Sixth Company of mission-
aries and had arrived in the Islands some three decades
earlier, in 1833. Emma was born in 1844, so she and
Frank were the same age. She broke her engagement and
began seeing Dillingham. They were married on April
26, 1869 in Kaumakapili Church with her father
officiating.
Frank now had a new partner in business and a new
partner in life. He and Emma had both made an excel-
lent choice in mates, and her support of Frank for almost
a half century was legendary.
He was not so lucky in business. This was a dubious
period in HawaiTs commercial climate—staggering
though the transition between whaling's collapse and the
rise of sugar. Large suppliers pulled Dillingham's credit
lines, and his accounts here were paid late. Yet he had to
offer credit, even while being denied it, and an 1872 ad
offers buyers "the most Liberal Terms." To exacerbate
matters, Alfred Castle died suddenly in 1874, barely 30
years old, leaving a widow and two young daughters.
Castle and Dillingham had a verbal agreement that
Frank would buy out the partnership, but Castle had
died before they had committed it to paper. Now there
were a widow and small children, and a bereaved S.N.
Castle negotiating with Frank on their behalf. The process
was a long one for all concerned, but was eventually
settled. Dillingham was on to bigger things.
The conundrum facing Dillingham was that he had
been offered the opportunity to buy James Campbell's
56,000 acres in 'Ewa and Kahuku but could not raise the
money in Hawaii. Investors here still thought Campbell
an.'
tan*
awe
tete
fie
rep
dr
tat
twm
AR00010378

The Great Land Scheme
The naysayers in Honolulu's world of finance scoffed
at James Campbell's original purchase of the lands in
'Ewa and Kahuku, and scoffed again at Dillingham's
enthusiastic efforts to find financial backing for his
option to purchase them from Campbell. Clearly values
have changed: Frank held an option to buy 115,750
acres of land at $600,000, about what a decent single-
family home would cost today in Manoa.
Yet this scheme might be Dillingham's big score. It
made perfect sense. He could see it clearly. Why couldn't
anyone else? He hit the road in search of money, going so
far as London, then the financial capital of the world.
Farm boy, seafarer, dairyman, hardware distributor,
railroad magnate, capitalist, Frank Dillingham had many
careers, but he was a promoter and land developer at
heart. And a huge booster of his adopted Island home.
He wrote several long letters to the
Railway Herald
in
London in 1887 that explained his feelings about
opportunities in Hawan, and why people should invest
there. Financially, the trip was a flop—even half a world
away, investors were fearful of an increasingly unsettled
political situation. They had cause to be, for within
eleven years, the Islands would have the King forced to
sign a "Bayonet Constitution" relinquishing most of his
powers; have a mini-revolt (to restore his powers) put
down; see the Queen overthrown by a cabal of primarily
American businessmen; suffer a counter-revolution; then
reel through a series of governments—from Monarchy to
Provisional, Republic and finally a U.S. Territory.
Despite Dillingham's failure to secure financing
overseas, however, his trip had one great benefit: he
traveled with Samuel Wilder, another Honolulu busi-
nessman, who was seeking foreign dollars for a railroad
on the Big Island. Wilder was then working on his third
line and must have shared his vast Hawai`i railroad
experience with Dillingham.
Once Frank got back to the Islands, he and Cambpell
agreed to exchange the land via lease rather than outright
purchase. Since Campbell had struck artesian water in
Honouliuli, the land in 'Ewa was no longer an arid plain.
And once Dillingham's railroad was built, it was no
longer remote either. Investors unwilling to sink money
into the land colonization scheme, were willing to invest
in a railroad serving suddenly arable land. It was still a
ticklish proposition for Frank Dillingham to raise the
money, but now he had a chance.
Samuel Gardner Wilder
Like Frank Dillingham,
Samuel Gardner Wilder (1831-
1888) was a multi-faceted Hawai`i
entrepreneur originally from
Massachusetts. Both married
missionary daughters. While
Dillingham went to sea as a teen,
Wilder traveled west and served for
a time as a Pony Express rider. He came to the Islands to
stay in 1858 and married Elizabeth Kinau Judd, daugh-
ter of the Mission physician-turned government official
Dr. Gerrit Parmalee Judd and his wife, Laura Fish Judd.
Samuel Wilder was involved in many projects over
his lifetime. He was a partner in 0`ahu's first sugar
plantanon and mill at the Judd family property at
Kualoa. He also started what became Wilder Steamship
Company, which later merged with Inter-Island Steam
Navigation. Politically, he served in the House of Nobles
and was a Minister of the Interior under King Kalakaua.
One of Wilder's last acts as Interior Minister in 1880 was
to sign the charter for the Hawaiian Railroad Company.
A sudden change of government—common in those
days—led to Wilder becoming a private citizen and, two
months later, president and founder of the Railroad.
Hawaiian Railroad Company was based at the port
of Mahukona on the Big Island. The line carried passen-
gers, but, like Frank Dillingham's later OR&L, depended
on moving sugar from the local mills to the port for
most of its profits.
In 1884 Samuel Wilder purchased the Kahului
Railroad on Maui. He made plans for another Big Island
line serving Hilo, and later in the decade, he and Frank
Dillingham traveled to London together in search of
investors for their projects.
Wilder was fourteen years older than Dillingham
and already well-versed in operating a railway in the
Islands. His expertise likely had an enormous impact on
Dillingham. Although neither was successful in raising
money abroad, Dillingham arrived back clear that in
order to sell or lease his Great Scheme acreage he would
have to build a railroad to service it.
Samuel Wilder died on July 28,1888, about six weeks
before Dillingham got his first railroad charter (for
OR&L). Wilder's Hilo line would have to wait two
decades after his death when much of it was finally built
by Dillingham.
15
was crazy for paying $154,500 for the two parcels a few
years before. Investing with Dillingham at $600,000 for
the same property seemed even more insane. Both tracts
were considered too far away and, even though Campbell
had brought in artesian water there in 1879, 'Ewa was
envisioned as a dry wasteland.
Dillingham could not raise the money offshore
either, as investors there were worried about HawaiTs
political climate. Campbell's living heirs should be
ecstatic that the long-ago land sale to Dillingham fell
apart, as the estate is still disbursing substantial monies
generated from that land to a number of them.
Dillingham could solve the transportation problem
with a railroad, of course, but since there was nothing
out there to speak of—an infintesimal number of people
and almost no freight—he could not justify the huge
costs of a train. The key to it all was water. So long as
there was almost none, and the 'Ewa plain would barely
support grazing cattle, then purchasing the land or
running a railroad would not capture willing investors.
In 1879 Campbell had brought in James Ashley, a
California well driller who struck artesian water at
Honouliuli in the 'Ewa district, a sign that the arid lands
there could quickly become lush. Dillingham was a
believer, but since he could not raise the capital to buy
the two tracts outright, Campbell offered to lease the
land to him for a half century at $50,000 a year.
Dillingham accepted and understood that to make
the deal profitable he had to provide cheap, reliable
transportation. He had now established the "& Land"
portion of his corporate name, so all he needed was the
capital and technical skills to create the "Oahu Railway"
part. And, of course, he needed a railroad franchise from
the monarchy.
Once he secured some tentative start-up financing,
Dillingham approached the government for legislative
approval. A decade earlier, in 1878, King Kalakaua had
signed "An Act to Promote the Construction of Rail-
ways," and within a year, the first passengers rode
between Kahului and Wailuku on Maui. Soon after that,
in 1880, the Hawaiian Railroad Company had been
chartered to run out of Mahukona on the Big Island. So
'Oahu, late to the sugar business, was late to the railroad
one as well.
On September 4, 1888—Frank Dillingham's 44th
birthday—the legislature voted to give him the franchise
for his proposed new railroad. And a week later King
Kalakaua signed it into law. Given the enormous capital
14
Above:
Like Frank Dillingham, James Campbell had been
a sea-going man who came ashore in the Islands and made
them his homeport fir life. Campbell was from Ireland, of
Scotch-Irish descent, a 24-year-old whaleship's carpenter
who landed on Maui in 1850. Twelve years later, he saw an
opportunity in sugar and co-founded Lahaina's Pioneer
Mill. He was very successful, and Hawaiians dubbed him
"Kimo Ona-Milliona" (James the Millionaire). In 1876 he
purchased some 15,000 acres at Kahuku on Oahu for
$63,500. The next year he sold his share in Pioneer Mill fir
$500,000 and spent $95,000 on 41,000 acres of barren
scrub land at 'Ewa on Oahu's Leeward Coast. The two
purchases totaling 56,000 acres (at an average of $2.83 per
acre) were considered "worthless" land—ironica4 it is land
still producing dollars for his heirs. His proposed sale to
Dillingham a fiw years later was for $600,000, a huge
profit. The fifiy year lease at $50,000/year worked for both
men as it enabled Dillingham to build his railway profit-
ably, while the land eventually reverted to Campbell's estate.
outlay on Dillingham's part, it was not a particularly
generous document, running for just twenty years with
no government subsidies. The charter also demanded
quick action—an operational steam railway from
Honolulu to the Pearl River Lagoon (it was not yet Pearl
Harbor) within just three years.
Quick action was something the entrepreneurial
AR00010379

ISSUE FOft
PCARL RIVIAR DIVISION
.700. 000,
IN 7.000 SHARES.
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Above:
Stock certificate No. 1 of the First Issue: 1000 shares to B.E Dillingham, signed by OR&L's president, William R. Castle,
and treasurer, Mark P Robinson. A note on the stub (not shown) is also signed by Robinson: "Stock is assigned by BE Dillingham
to Treasurer of the Company to be held until the satisfactory completion of the Contract by the Company. This original issue was
for $700,000 to complete the "Pearl River Division."
r
-----
accomplishment.
'Elm them Hallway.
At a meeting of the Oahu !tail tt
tay
and
land Company, held yesteaty after-
noon, /Ion. W. G. Irwin, Mr. T. lt.
Foster and lion. J. A. Cumitilrat
were
nowlit
appointed as trustees of the property
01 gatlit.r
the company in the interst of hotel- t LL i LL
holders.
Mr. A. S. Hartkvell
wits
appointed at-
torney to the company durintzthe
iintiei-
Patod absence of the President, lion. W.
It. Castle. Mr. W. 1'. Toler
UttA
all
pointed Secretary pro torn during leave
of absence to Mr. (fee. C. Williams.
About throe miles of the permanent
way are grades'. Sfr. Dillingham, the
contractor, leaves for the Coaat
nese connected therewith, by to-dey's
steamer. Ho will order two locomotives
of the latest pattern from the Italdwin ksitswlesIgt
Works, Philadelphia, which will be de- horn os•sr, I
livered in San Franciseo at ninety
tlity's interferet.
notice. In
ban Frani:Jew he will (Inter 10•1
1
14
tiati
fourteen passenger ear$ up to the 1,111,4 :11. well as
improved standard of suburban train .4, Tittle e
and nine freight earn. lIcs
hop% to keep hearts wit
lilapromise
of having tritium remelt% preeg, It

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within a year horn the pausing* of the
of the fo
franchise. vantioia,
It/ft•H•ttvii
u
tier,' ti
;
then
?
I
11,
WWI.,
.
4.
6
Th,
spe
the seiene
the rwlit
forees of
ii
at vie can
Dillingham was well-equipped to provide. The right-of-
way had to be aquired, then cleared and prepared for the
track gangs. People had to be hired, materiel ordered,
important decisions made. The
Paradise of the Pacific
magazine summed up these events in July 1892, almost
four years later:
"Now that you have secured your franchise, when
will the road he commenced?" was asked of Mr.
Dillingham on the same day by one of those who
looked upon the scheme as feasible.
"This is my birthday," said Mr. Dillingham, "and
one year from today you may have a ride on the
Oahu Railroad." The difficulties in the way of
keeping this promise may be imagined when it is
stated that not a blow had yet been struck nor a
dollar subscribed, and that the enterprise did not
find favor with the monied men. To incorporate a
company with a capital of $700,000 was the next
step, and under the circumstances, was no easy
matter.
No easy matter or not, the indefatigable Dillingham
forged ahead. Barely six months later, on March 9, 1889,
a ceremonial groundbreaking occured at Samuel M.
Damon's estate at Moanalua, with Frank Dillingham's
young son Harold turning over the first spade of earth.
According to the
Advertiser
The shovel which was used on the occasion by the
Dillingham boy is still preserved. Money could not
buy this token or souvenir from the man who made
the railroad and who, at the same time, created
prosperity for the country by making possibk several
of the grandest industrial estates in the world.
From that moment there was no stopping the
enterprise.
The legislature awarded the charter to Dillingharn
personally. He transferred it to the corporation of which
he was not even an officer. Instead he took the position
of General Manager, and, during the constrution phase
of the Pearl River Division, was hired as contractor—we
would call him General Contractor today—for the road.
He took ultimate responsibility for completing his own
dream. And he consistently built for the future, using far
better materials and workmanship quality than he had to.
The
Pacific Commercial Advertiser
reported on an
organizational meeting on April 12, 1889, at which "The
Promise" was again noted:
Operationally, Dillingham's first decision was an easy
one: standard vs. narrow gauge? Used
on
long haul
railroads across the United States, standard gauge—four
feet, eight-and-a-half inches between the rails—was more
expensive for every facet of the system. Locomotives and
cars were larger and thus the train used more fuel. The
track was heavier and ran on a wider roadbed. The cost
per mile for using standard gauge for OR&L would have
been prohibitive, and, realistically, there was no real need
for using it.
Distances were not great on 0`ahu, and the three-
foot narrow gauge selected by Dillingham was an ideal
choice. The five plantations along the line to come, plus
the Army's Fort Kamehameha line and Navy's tracks at
Pearl Harbor, all standardized at OR&I's three-foot
gauge.
But those other trains were "down the line," as a
railroad man might say, for neither the plantations nor
the military bases had yet been created. It remained for
Dillingham, as the project's contractor, to get his tracks
laid in time for the grand opening. Despite what in
hindsight we would see as a great investment opportu-
nity, the financing was still tight, and Dillingham—no
stranger to going deep into debt—did just that. He sunk
much of his own money into the railway-to-be and
convinced as many individuals and corporate entities as
he could to purchase OR&L stock. Had it not been for
his friend Mark Robinson's last minute investment of
$30,000, the rails could not have been ordered from
Germany, and the project might have stumbled, or
worse, collapsed.
Even so, it was touch-and-go during the first few
years. Allan Renton, whose forebearers ran Ewa Planta-
tion for two generations, notes that "Castle & Cooke's
investment in Oahu Railway almost bankrupted them in
the early days."
Meanwhile Dillingham was raising money and
spending it just as fast as it came in to build his railroad.
In October 1888 he hired Charles H. Kleugel, then 41
and a well-traveled civil engineer and land surveyor who
had spent the past twenty-one years on various projects
in both Mexico and California. Kleugel became OR&I:s
chief engineer, designated to plan the roadbed. To help
him oversee the mostly Chinese laborers, Kleugel hired
young George Denison, who went on to work for
OR&L for almost its entire history. As land was ac-
quired, surveyed, cleared and leveled, Denison's track
gangs were ballasting the roadbed with coral and spiking
30-pound rail into `ohi`a ties at a furious pace.
The Saturday July 27, 1889 issue of the
Pacific
Commercial Advertiser
ran the following story under their
Hawaii News Summary:
Among the most important works now in progress
of rapid construction, is the Oahu Railway to Pearl
Harbor, which is already approaching completion,
so far as grading is concerned Eleven miles of this
line will have the grading completed in two weeks;
and of this length ten miles are aleady finished. The
material for the bridges is already on the ground,
and the work of driving the piles has been begun at
the larger estuaries of Kalihi and Moanalua. A few
of the bridges on this line will be of considerable
length; but, with the present energy being dis-
16
?
17
AR00010380

Above:
OR&L's first engine was this small Baldwin,
Kauila #6
It had been ordered by the government but found unsuitable and
sold to Frank Dillingham for his birthday ride on September 4, 1889 (and shown here much later at the station in Pearl City).
In traditional Hawaiian fashion, kauila likely had two meanings. As one word it represents Hawaii's densest wood, used for
spears and kapa beaters. Dismantled into two words, ka uila has a meaning of lightning. So there is an aura of both toughness
and flash in the little locomotive's name. It was numbered 6 fi9r his daughter Marion's age at the time of its acquisition.
Proposals Wanted.
'
itior.
EA LED PROPOSALS WILL BE RE-
k
1
ceived up to t2 o'clock noun, September
1st, at the office of the Company
011
Mer-
chant street. this city, for the erection of a
Terminal Depot for the Oahu Railroad and
Land Co. Plans and specifications may be
,
1
seen and all necessary information ob-
tained at the office. The right to reject
reserved. 4U-tti

Back to top


SALMON
A few Barrels of
the
abol,r
?
no-
celvett
per
"S. N.
Cmtle."
For Sale by
17-
1 w
?
CASTLE & COOKE.
ANDERSON & LUNDY,

Back to top


Dentists.
ARTIFICIAL TEETH
from one to an entire set in-
serted on gold, silver, allum-
inum and rubber bases.
Crown and bridge work a specialty. To
persons wearing rubber plates which are a
constant source of irritation to the
mouth and throat, we would recommend
our Prophylactic Metal Plate. All oper-
ations performed in accordance with the
latest Improvements in dental science.
Teeth extracted without pain by the use of
Nitrous Oxide Gas.
pp
-
Hotel street, Tregloan premises.
played only a short time will elapse before the gaps
in the line will all disappear. Many of the smaller
bridges and culverts have been already built. There
will be altogether twenty bridges between Honolulu
and Ewa, of various lengths—from 16 to 300 feet,
with an aggregate length of 1250 feet.
Plans have been approved by which the main depot
will be placed 180 feet from King street in what is
now a fish-pond dividing Oahu prison from the
royal stables. A large portion, if not alk of this
extensive fish-pond will be filled in without delay,
and this substantial and eligible building ground,
artificially firmed, will become of great value by
close proximity to the main depot buildings. The
depot itself will be of imposing size and made as
ornamental in appearance as convenience and
traffic requirements will allow. The grading of the
whole division of this line, twelve miles, will be
completed within the next month; and the laying of
the rails will commence immediately upon their
arrival by the bark
Deutschland
now nearly due
from Germany. The progress of this important work
has been so rapid during the month offuly that we
give it first place among works in progress.
The crews were flying. The first ceremonial shovelful
of dirt had been turned on March 9, and according to
the
Advertiser
report above, in the 140 days since, ten
miles of roadbed was graded and ready for rail. This was
by hand labor, using saws and axes to clear the land,
shovels and picks to level it. Frank Dillingham had
ordered a steamshovel (which in those days really ran on
steam), but it did not arrive until mid-November.
Again in the story, "plans have been approved" for
the station. Almost a month later, on August 23rd, a
small ad for proposals to build the main depot appeared
in the
Advertiser:
Sealed bids were to be presented to OR&L on
September 1 for an edifice for which land was being
created. The building was to be framed, finished and
open for business by November 16. Today, with concrete
trucks, power saws, and pneumatic nail guns, we're lucky
to build a small house in the time it took these men to
create a huge custom-designed railroad depot.
Despite a few skeptics, the story was big news, and
each success appeared in the papers. While we complain
about wading through ads to get the news, in that era,
they were really clear about their focus—"Commercial
Advertiser" was what that paper was about, and the vast
majority of the front page was ads. Most news was
relegated further back with very small headlines. The ads
were often great, however, and included an odd-looking
salmon and dentists on Hotel Street offering what appear
to be a pretty uncomfortable set of choppers with which
to consume it.
Dillingham had ordered two small Baldwin steam
locomotives, as well as passenger and freight cars. While
the legislature had given him three years to reach the
Pearl River Lagoon, he had talked himself into the
challenge to demonstrate a working railroad on his 45th
birthday, and he aimed to meet that elusive goal.
Thanks to an enormous piece of luck, Frank
Dillingham's birthday was a happy one. The two new
locomotives that were being manufactured by Baldwin
did not leave the factory in Philadelphia until July, too
late for them to appear in Honolulu in time for the
September 4 festivities.
However the monarchy had also ordered a new
locomotive from Baldwin, apparently to haul material
from Moiliili Quarry (now the site of the University of
Hawai`i's Manoa parking structure) for various projects.
Years before, an earlier Fowler locomotive, the
Huki
Moku
(Island Hauler), had failed miserably at the same
task, and the Baldwin was no better. There is some
question as to whether it was even tried. In any case,
Dillingham bought it, just in time to demonstrate the
few miles of OR&L track that was already spiked into
place. He numbered the little saddle tank engine "6" (for
his youngest daughter Marion's age), and named it
Kauikz.
It still exists today, proudly displayed at the Hawaiian
Railway Society in 'Ewa.
Kauda
was pushing—not pulling—two third-class
cars just arrived from Carter Brothers in California. They
had canvas tops, open sides and longitudinal bench seats
(not hugely unlike the excursion cars run today by the
Hawaiian Railway Society).
Manning the controls in the little locomotive's cab
was George Kent with Charles Kleugel, OR&Us chief
engineer riding shotgun. Kleugel was long reputed to be
driving the train, but the
Advertiser
ran a retraction on
September 19 explaining the error.
In our
report of the trial
trip on
the
0.1lin railroad in yesterday's issue, it
1 %vita Mated that the engineer of the corn-
0
n
u
t
)
:
14
drove
ei ti
it.eh
eComp
1 oe otn
a
ny's
oti ye .
engi
M
n
re
.
er
C.
w
H
as
.
On the
engine; hut the
driving
was done
. by Mr. George Kent,
the
loco:not'
(e
engineer.
----
?
--
As the locomotive began pushing the two cars down
the track, "an affusion of damp soot" puffed out the stack
and blanketed the passenger cars, swirling in through the
open sides and coating Dillingham and his guests, many
18
?
19
AR00010381

DAILY
inTizinur:
ITO.Y01.1.111.7, H. T.. SEPTEMBER 8, 1369.
HURRAH FOR THE RAILROAD!
Cdatraater Difilaithata Celebratra
Birthday aetterdiag to Pro-
mise.
A sort of preliminary opening of
the Oahu Railway took place yester-
day. The contractor's new engine,
from the Baldwin Locomotive
Works, with a train of two third
class cars, made a trial trip on the
rails to the Palama rice plantation,
a distance of about a mile. Al-
though the track was unballasted,
this trial trip had to be made ia re-
demption of a promise.
Mr. B. F. Dillingham, promoter
of the Oahu Railway and Land
Company, on his birthday a year
previous, was accosted by an ac-
quaintance with the remark:
44
-Well, Mr. Dillingham, you have
got your franchise2 when are you
going to give
us the railway?"
Mr. Dillingham replied that on
his next birthday, that day one year,
he hoped to treat hiefriends to a
railway ride.
Since the giving of this promise
many things have arisen to threaten
the failure of its fulfilment. It was
"touch and go" for the bark
Deutschland to arrive in time with
rails from Bremen. There were
other critical circumstances attend-
ing the effort, but, with a strong
company now at his back, the
originator of the enterprise. having
taken the contract to build the road,
resolutely pushed operations to their
present advanced stage.
When the appointed day arrived
Mr. Dillingham was ready to celc-
brate. Hie engine had been
set up
some days. Two third class cars,
the best passenger accommodation
as yet on the ground. were put to-
gether. They were attached to the
collision end of the locomotive, the
bullseye headlight lamp glaring up-
on the passengers. Seated in the
forward car were the following cid-
zena: lion. W. R. Castle, president
of the Oahu Railway and
Land
Company ;
Hous, II. M. Whitney,
II. A. Widemann, Paul Neumann,
M. P. Robinson, A. Jaeger and
Prank Brown ; Marshal J. II. So-
per, Dr. J. M. Whitney, Messrs. E.
Muller, W. M. Giffard, II. Lose,
Godfrey Brown, J. G. Spencer, W,
A. Bowes, Marcus Colburn, Geo.
P. Castle, J. L. Torbert, IT. A.
Parmelee, J. II. Fisher, C. lianomer,
T. S. Southwick, John Grace. D.
Logan of the BULLETIN, F.
J.
Testa,
W. G. Ashley, secretary 0. R.
&
L.
Co., and II. P. Dillingham, with a
few others. The rear car
Wag
crowd-
ed with natives.
With a shrift blast fron3 the whis-
tie. and the bell clanging, the engine
moved easily
off
with, its load.
Three rousing cheers were given by
the passengers, and crowds assem-
bled at die. starting, point respond-
ed.
Groups of natives were scat-
tered all slang the line, the men
shouting, the women waving saluta-
tions, and the children screaming
with pleasure at the advent of the
iron horse. The cars ran with most
remarkable stnootitneee notwith-
standing the absence of ballast from
the track, showing very excellent
work iu constructing the permanent
way as well as a superior article of
springs under the coaches. Indeed,
many of the passengers
had often
had rougher rides in first class cars
on old established railways. The
speed given the train was high un-
der the circumstances, being esti-
mated at about ten miles an hour.
Mr. Kluegel, civil engineer of the
company, manipulated the throttle
valve and exercised the greatest
care against accident.
When the engine started
an effu-
sion of damp soot fell upon the pas-
sengers in front, giving their faces
the appearance of having met with
a powder explosion. President
Castle wore a fresh-laundried white
linen suit, which was scooted to him
in fine polka dot style. He regarded
the baptism as a pledge of good faith
from the road, similar to the ancient
English practice of sealing land
sales with the delivery of a sod from
the property to the purchaser.
It was mot deemed advisable to
detain the passenger* for the return
trip, as the boiler flue of the engine
developed some defect requiring a
little time to remedy. The elated
guests of the occasion, however,
found it no hardship to
make their
way
a few rods across lots to join
the King street tramcars for town.
All on the cars were jubilant
over
the success of the trial trip, and Mr.
Dillingham was heartily congratu-
lated on the redemption of his birth-
day promise.
In the course of a few weeks the
line to Pearl Harbor will be com-
pleted and efficient rolliog stock
have arrived from the State*. Then
it is probable that the railway will
have a grand inauguration.
!anis
)ther
car
s in
thou
1day
leers
tome
r
the
:land
tore?
waiis
atur-
be a
Mr.
Class
!cted
will
Berc.
yde's
the
the
poll
tior
arIV
eiet
and
per'
fon
con
Car
Fm
ice!
Dillingham the Dreamer ...
Frank Dillingham dreamed big. He could see
opportunities where others simply saw insurmountable
problems. The Honolulu financiers of the day were used
to taking risks—often very big ones—as they invested in
start-ups with slim chance of making it.
But Dillingham's ideas seemed bigger, and riskier.
He had a long track record of operating his hardware
business on a frayed shoestring, constantly on the verge
of bankruptcy, yet just as constantly expanding.
As soon as he purchased Father Dimond's hardware
business, he moved it to a new location on King Street,
the first fireproof building in Honolulu. A few years
later, he expanded and moved it again, this time to a
huge emporium on Fort Street. His business mantra
seemed to be: never to stay put, always keep moving.
The sea, where he had spent his teenage years, was a
stern teacher, and it taught different men different
things. It seemed to teach him—and James Campbell—
the value of work, a gritty optimism, and the ability to
choose the more difficult path leading to greater rewards.
America is littered with projects others derided as
'follies," which ulimately panned out to be enormous
successes. Fulton's Folly netted a working steamboat. The
Louisiana Purchase (900,000 square miles at four cents
an acre) was Jefferson's Folly. Buying Alaska (at 2.5 cents
an acre) was Seward's Folly. And, closer to home, buying
'Ewa and Kahuku was Campbell's Folly, and developing
it was Dillingham's Folly.
Both Campbell and Dillingham netted millions and
millions of Folly Dollars on those projects.
Frank Dillingham was a rare dreamer, one of those
able to create and execute his dreams. And to follow
through, no matter how far-fetched the plan seemed to
critics.
Even before he applied for the franchise, Dillingham
realized that the railroad would come close to paying for
itself when the Ewa Plantation came on line, and that he
had to somehow keep the entire project afloat, with land
sales at Pearl City and excursion trains luring passengers
out for picnics and boat rides, until the cargo business
was strong.
Meanwhile, he had expanded Woodlawn Dairy, and
his hardware business, and had tried to find dollars for
his Great Land Scheme. When that didn't work, he
shifted from buying to leasing the land from Campbell
and financing the railroad. It is interesting that local
investors were more willing to put $700,000 in his train
than $600,000 in all that land.
Below:
Pulling across the long-since-filled-in Kalihi Lagoon. Photographer Richard B. Jackson shot this scene in the early 1920s.
of whom were wearing what a moment before were
white suits.
Years later, after reading the various reports of the
incident, the late Gerald Best, consummate railfan and
collector, and author of the classic history,
Railroads of
Hawaii,
analyzed the occurance and offered an educated
guess as to its cause:
This writer's long experience with just thil type
locomotive has taught him that too much water in
the boiler causes the engine to 'prime,' or suck water
from the boiler through the throttle when the latter
is opened wide. The water goes to the cylinders,
returns with the exhaust, and shoots out the stack
in a giant sooty stream. Kleugel had learned the
hard way how to run a small engine!"
Dillingham won his boast of giving railroad rides on
his 45th birthday, and his soot-encrusted excursionists
enjoyed their preview of the railway.
Early the next morning, staff and contractors were
back hard at work, both on the main depot at Honolulu
and extending the track two parallel rails at a time
toward Pearl River. They were—according to the char-
ter—a couple of years ahead of schedule. But that was by
design. Frank Dillingham knew well that a railroad
under construction hemorraged dollars ... there was
plenty of outgo and no income, except for the occasional
stock purchaser. So they moved at great speed, targeting
another upcoming date two-and-a-half months away.
November 16—King Kalakaua's birthday—was
traditionally declared a holiday by the monarchy. In this
particular year, the King and his consort, Queen
Kapi'olani, would held a reception at lolani Palace, and
20
21
fhici
g
ii
AR00010382

JO
'
same
J
Jr. For
common
out be-
years of
o effect
i'rance,
le day
rmans,
mbl
oh
bc-
kes
Al-
Ge
effect
ma2012
penal
infiui-
MI
Os.
rms.
Anti MUSIC
-
fan.
The arrests up to II :30 o'clock last.
night were: One wahine,for being drunk,
and a Chinese merchant named Aldo for
conspiracy. It seems that the latter in
accused of attending two meetings held
by the rioters at Palma, one of which
C
was
O
on tl en the
?
cy reached its c Imax.
A moonlight picnic party went on the
Oahu railway last night as far as the
rails are laid, which is In the neighbor-
hood of
Salt Lake. The rails are
now
being put down speedily ; and before the
conclusion of the present month, we ex-
pect to
make a
trip
to Ewa by ran.
The
party referred to left by the tram at,
8:30 p. m.
learn that among that
?
ea
on t
?
V
Gown
?
heard
at the Octo
?
the Supreme
Court, that of Albert Loomens, the Bel-
gian, will be the find. Be will be
P.
Book
Charles H. Kleugel
Long renowned as one of HawaiTs foremost
civil engineers, Charles Henry Kleugel was the
man who designed OR8cUs track layout. He was
born in 1847 in Cuahoga County, Ohio and
received his civil engineering degree at Union
College in 1867. He went to work on various
projects in California, Washington and Mexico
for two decades. In 1888 he came to Hawail
and went to work for Oahu Railway as chief
engineer until 1907. He worked for a time for
the Department of Public Works, then returned
to Dillingham as chief engineer for Hilo Rail-
road Company. In 1913 he became the inspect-
ing and consulting engineer of Waiahole Water
Company. Kleugel died in Honolulu in 1928.
1\vo Baldwins Arrive ... just in time for Opening Day
St
Above:
The line's second and third locomotives were purchased from Baldwin. They did not arrive in time for Dillingham's
birthday ride, but were here with time to spare for the railroad's official Grand Opening on Kalakaua's birthday. Locomotive No.
15 was also known as Le`ahi, the Hawaiian name for Diamond Head.
Below:
Baldwin locomotive No.
– -
19
?
was also called
Ka'ala—named
_
for the highest peak on 0`ahu, in the Waranae Range.
:4
,4
Ww;44
there were both a yacht race and a couple of baseball
games planned.
Most importantly for Frank Dillingham, the date
was also the official opening of Oahu Railway's service
from Honolulu to the Pearl River Lagoon. The two
Baldwin locomotives had finally arrived on September 25
and were subject to Dillingham's whimsical numbering
system, with nothing remotely sequential about it. They
were numbered for the then-ages of Frank and Emma's
two oldest children, son Walter (15) and daughter May
(19).
Both Baldwins were 4-4-0s and were initially
successful primarily because the line's roadbed was
relatively level and loads were light (until the tons of
sugar bags that would fill boxcar after boxcar when Ewa
Plantation's mill finally kicked in).
The first Baldwin locomotives were physically small,
and were dwarfed by the passenger cars that had arrived
from Carter Brothers in Newark, California. Some of
these original Carter-built cars would last the life of the
railway.
The Carter Brothers order included:
2 hand cars
2 track-laying cars
8 flat cars
1 box car
6 flat cars with tops and seats, suitable for
third-class passengers or excursion cars
2 second-class cars
2 combination freight and smoking cars
4 first-class cars
1 first-class parlor car with chair seats and one
or two lounges, WC on each side for gentle
men and ladies, upolstered in plush, every
thing finished in first-class style.
While OR&L's entire economic being was predicated
on the belief that 0`ahu would soon host a major sugar
industry, that was several years away, and the cars
ordered-15 passenger and nine cargo—reflected that.
Years later, when the six sugar plantations were in full
production and the branch up to Wahiawa served the
pineapple industry there, the ratio of passenger to cargo
cars was skewed wildly in favor of boxcars, flatcars and
gondolas.
Meanwhile, creating a railway was an exciting
spectator sport on Orahu, and the press reported on it
regularly. Even before the road officially opened, it was
22
available for after-hours excursions, as this October 4,
1889
Advertiser
story of a "moonlight picnic party as far
as the rails are laid" attests:
AR00010383

P...". ?
: ? ' 1".111 "3F . .....; 4"."'. ?
..
s ?
OF ?
.
7 .........2
1
,
14, . „,,,---,-
..
4r
-
"
7
r.verriv.ap
._,,...
?
..,
V -.
?
, 1, }
a
`
ii-
?
mr
,---„
,,,,, ......,
I
t
""61'.. IP ?
"..
. "fig ",
' lir
qa
uPgr.701 ?
• •uwas....... -
_
Above:
Pearl
was an ultra-luxurious parlor car fitted with both ladies and mens rooms, and designed so that it could quickly
convert to a royal car should a member of the royal family be aboard. This car from Carter Brothers was clearly an extravagance
given the railway's operational deficit at the time, however it extended the perception of luxury to the line.
1011.1
•••••
Below:
Pearl's
spectacular interior. She was variously called
"the palace car" and 'Mrs. Dillingham's car"
24
Above:
A handplane owned by Takato Kagawa, a master car-builder and carpenter who worked for OR6L for almost
fifty
years.
Mr. Kagawa was often selected by Walter Dillingham to do special projects at the family's Diamond Head mansion, La Pietra.
25
And The Pearl ... from Palace Car to Observation Car
?
Hawaii's Creative Workforce ... a Century
Ago
Above:
Draw knift owned by ORth-L master car builder
Takata Kagawa.
Below:
Pearl
after conversion into Car #48, shown here
during World War II. The car was later donated to the
Hibiscus 6- Heleconia line in Kahuku. They stripped off the
paneling and restored her into an observation car again.
A hundred years ago the citizens of the Hawaiian
Islands were far more self-sufficient than we are today.
The 2400 miles of ocean which served as a highway
served also as an enormous time deterrent. So, to an
extent, self-sufficiency was forced upon the Islands. Well
beyond that, there was inherent creative talent in both
the native Hawaiians and the more recent arrivals.
Nowhere was this more evident than in the labor
force, where skilled hands did not reach for a telephone
or keyboard to order replacement parts, they reached for
their tools and built them, often from scratch. In iron
works, railroad yards, sugar mills, streetcar barns, farms,
pineapple canneries, and blacksmith shops across the
Islands, men pounded, brazed, sawed and forged new
pieces for existing machines. In some cases, such as the
Gimcana pineapple
processor, they created entirely new
devices.
The ordering process we are accustomed to now—
email a credit card number to the East Coast this
morning and tomorrow afternoon the FedEx guy is
handing you a package— took weeks and weeks to
complete a hundred years ago.
There was no such luxury of time. The locomotive
had to be put back in service. The already-harvested
sugar crop was losing precious sucrose awaiting the
conveyor into the mill to be fixed. The fresh vegetables
in crates at Makua had to get to market. The jobs had to
be done, the repairs effected, and HawaiTs laborers were
more than up to the task.
Above:
A. E. Santos was a foreman at the OR&L car barn
for many years.

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AR00010384

virA. worths attorney aer uezetararne.
Progreso of the Oahu Railway.
There have now arrived for the Oahu
Railroad Co. this week 22,255 ties or as
many as will lay an additional eight
nines of road-21,300
bi -
these
are red-
wood ties from the coast, and
1,455 are
of obis, Umber from the district of Puna,
Hawaii. Since the arrival ol these ties,
the rails are being laid at the rate of half
anlleperdy,ind the road Is now fin-
ished to the neighborhood of Salt Lake.
One of the new locomotives, which has
been namedthe "ICaala' was set up yes-
terday, and on the steam being put on,
!t
ar
e every satiefaction. will be
y for work today; and the other
new locomotive, the "Lealii," is being
put together and wiU be ready in a
week. The locomotives are of the
latest improved pattern., and weigh
fourteen tons each. There will be no
more waiting _for ties, u those being
prepared on Hawaii will'reeet reenlre-
meats as they occur. By November let,
six miles will be complete& and by De-
cember let, nine or ten miles, and be-
fore Christmas osus will be running to
Ewa Court Hones.
Complimentary Concert.
The Royal Hawaiian Band will give a
Complimentary Band eoneert at the
Hawaiian Hotel this evening at 780
flaw
t and
'esent
been
)ain's
a, 123
flrias
&rig
blued
is, a
what
)assen
vs.
U.
r,
etc..
alpha-
se Ifa-
gives
of law
writ-
atol-
1 opin-
And
corner
t.
Isla In
been
/street
060 IL
July
by Id
went
Wlicx
dinin
ParT
offere
10 o'c
no pa
crc
Wit&
r
conin
why
was a
Br
incrir
right
Te
Hai
could
reasot
Cots
wish
don.
Mr.
prove
the re
oath.
Teel
Mr.
thode
one of
Teal
R.
ed wil
years.
on Ju
leaps—
club
nee of
I. A.
mop
they
The
Per-
,
read-
rig by
tom by
ra.
tr. A.
tacrip-
C. C.
-aaing
citified
up to
ned to
subject
present
v.
Bent.
loarades
gentle,.
hem did
-esented
Vhittier,
liarte,
t
a 8010
ligato;
• Wil-
enter-
th the
ses of
large
sf
the
corn-
could
r
have
always
e mono-
.
Fri
10,690 FR'
From our
Al,
ORANC
NUT, Ala
APPLE_,
FIG, ;NEM
MIMIC •
old ; 31.50 to
ft is our
pt
but what we
we know
fr
Islands.
Patties se
sun
or
Ds
and,,
Planta
best lime to
gerrull
to plant and
Address
Or
Nt: Cid I
••••
••
Meanwhile supplies kept pouring in as crews rushed
to install them. The article below appeared in the
October 18, 1889 edition of the
Pacific Commercial
Advertiser.
The
`ohra
ties were ordered from major OR&L
stockholder Mark Robinson, who had the trees felled in
Puna and the ties cut at the Rycroft sawmill near Hilo.
But the track crews were moving faster than the supply
of local ties, so Dillingham turned to redwood from the
mainland.
This story mentions locomotives being set up. These
sophisticated machines were built and run-tested at the
factory and then partially "knocked down" to save
money during shipping. Once they arrived, they were re-
assembled here by OR8cL, and readied for service. The
original two locomotives Dillingham had ordered from
Baldwin arrived in late September, plenty of time for the
line's Opening Day, on November 16, 1889.
Finally the big day—OR8c1:s official opening on the
King's Birthday—arrived. There were several free events
going on in Honolulu that Saturday: a balloon ascent by
Above:
Untold thousands of hand-driven spikes like this
one studded rails into the ties along the ORth-E's tracks and
sidings. Over the entire history of the line, this process was
never mechanized.
the barnstorming daredevil "Professor" Joseph Van
Tassel! beneath Punchbowl, and OR8cI2s celebration by
offering free train rides to the public.
Two weeks earlier the celebrated aeronaut Van Tassell
had ascended some 5,000 feet from ICapi`olani Park in his
balloon, then climbed from the basket and parachuted
safely down again. His Punchbowl demonstration did
not go as well. He took a speeding, unscheduled trip out
to sea, landed in the ocean offshore and was never found.
His manager offered a fifty dollar reward for Van
Tassell's body as newspapers on the Mainland trumpeted
that he had been devoured by sharks.
By contrast, Frank Dillingham's day went swim-
mingly. His new Baldwin locomotives performed
flawlessly, as did the newly-hired, newly-trained crews.
Operating a steam locomotive was—like being a
jetliner pilot today—one of the most complex jobs of the

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IIIIERCIAL ADVERTISER, DIG-
110 FOR NALAWAt
Manager ttlIttaghass Offers Pros Trani-
portatlon.
The energetic, pushing, go *head Mr.
B.
P.
Dillingham, Manager
of the Oahe
Railway,
proposes to give all residents a
chance to have • free ride for Use last
time, ots the Oahu itsilway, cm Saturday,
the King's Birthday. Trains will leave
the station, at the Prison road, every
hoar from 7 a. m. to 5 p. m. The trains
will rua near to Dr. McOrew's residence
at Pearl. Harbor, remain there
a
short
while sad then return to town. Tickets
will be issued by Mr. Frank A. Auer-
bach to-day and Friday. from 10 a. m. to
4 p. m. at the office of
Mr. J.
E. Brown,
Merchant street, for each,hain. Parties
desiring to enjoy A
ride will have to state
the train they
intend leavinF on and a
tickut merited for that hour wsll be given.
Sir cam will be attached to each
train,
thus affurding ample accommodation,
and there will be no crowding. This
public spiritedness on
the part of
Mr.
Dillingham will no doubt be highly ap-
;
predated and largely availed of.
?
ROOTED
On Monday
the 18th inst.
the
line will ties
of Tabh
be opened for regular business, three cents each.
trains leaning daily as fbIlows: Leave
station at 7 :30 and 10 a. in., and
3 p. m.,
returning at 0:30 a. m., 12 noon and
b
p. tn.. The Wee to
theopposite terminus Tee thous&
and back.will
be first chute $1, isecond a
Ulna ;
cleat
75 cents, third class 50 tents. ?
cut the first
?
$5 per 100.
AUCTION SALE
$1 a very
by a
flI c.Imp
si hearing
ILl
close
he sup
-
another.
td
es,
dead
and..."
ru101
--
Above:
The
Pacific Commercial Advertiser
story of Oahu
Railway's November 16th opening.
era. Since the training curve for an engineer could often
stretch years, experienced engineers were hired from
mainland lines. Later engineers were trained by OR&L,
but there was simply no time to do that for the first hires.
An estimated 4,000 people took Dillingham up on
his offer of free rides out to the end of the line and back
on the 16th, and the trains ran all day. There was no
turnaround at the end of the line, so the locomotives
pulled the cars in one direction, and then pushed them
in reverse in the other. Perhaps for a majority of the
riders it was a first glimpse of the territory beyond
Honolulu proper, an area which included Samuel
Damon's fabulous gardens at Moanalua and the gentle
lagoons of the Pearl River.
There were no Sunday newspapers, so the first
reports of Saturday's activities appeared on Monday,
November 18. The
Advertiser
noted that the mere
presence of the rail line encouraged what we now call
diversified agriculture—a term unknown to Dillingham
but certainly a concept he embraced—as crops would
now be close to market. "The land near and above the
railroad, through its entire length, is probably capable of
being irrigated with artesian wells, and thus brought
under cultivation, for bananas, rice or fruit trees."
Indeed, OR8c1:s first freight order was to haul forty
bunches of bananas to a ship in the harbor or the
vendors of Chinatown.
It went unspoken that the line's ultimate success
hinged on growing enormous quantities of sugar at 'Ewa.
Oahu Railway, at this point, was a huge gamble. It could
not—really could never, except perhaps during the spike
of World War II fifty years hence—depend on passenger
traffic alone to turn a profit.
Unlike the Honolulu Rapid Transit's electric street-
cars (still a decade away) where the entire business was
shuffling people around, there were almost no people
where the train went. Even years later, when the sugar
and pineapple plantations were flourishing, the thousands
of residents laboring there were not commuters. Housing
was provided on the plantation, and they worked six
long days a week.
Frank Dillingham developed Pearl City for housing
--and offered special ten-cent train fares for residents—
but sales were slow when he needed them most, and not
everyone who purchased there was a commuter. Many
bought lots to create weekend homes, especially on the
beautiful Pearl City Peninsula.
In the meantime what Dillingham did have was
locomotives, cars, track, and employees to operate it all.
Taking the train itself was a unique experience for most
riders, but one round trip ended that uniqueness, and a
better inducement was needed for people to purchase
tickets.
Since there were as yet no real destinations along the
line, he created the concept of picnicking along the Pearl
• 1" ?
x'
IT —1
New
.
••
RIRF
ROSES;
old ; BO to 40
FY
27
26
AR00010385

1
di
re
In
31
agent in thie city.
Tile excursion by means of the Oahu
Railway ro. line and the connection with
steamer at I Ittlawa, protnises to hu one
of tile events of the Henson. The tickets
being limited, only thu nutnher of per-
sons who can be properly accommodated
will be allowtul
The physician's committee to ascer-
tain the particular name and character
of the throat trouble now prevalent in
town. met yesterday afternoon, and the
eniimiluttgis
a
moting_app
.
ears in the tx,r-
I er
4 in
tow
remit
oc-
Oil
the
the
ors.
Ordli
PytIt
movie
big
on Ft
strao
hest.
111
coin!
Thin
the
(mei
only
,
r
4
Luna
TRAINS WILL LEAVE
HONOLULU
a over the
Oahu Railway & Land Co. as
follows:
LEAVE HONOLULU
DEPOT.
ARRIVI HONOLULU
DEPOT.
7:80
A. N.
9:30
A.
M.
10:00 A.
N.
1200
n.
8.00 P. N.
4:80
P. N.
Ho for Halawa and the Lakes of
PEARL HARBOR!
GRAND EXCURSION ON SATURDAY
The fad instant.
hams on Math.
The Oahu
Railway Co. propose to run
a regular series of trains on Sundays
froth this time forth. The traveling
18
public demand it and it therefore be-
comes a work of
necessity.
How dear to the heart of each true
0
T1
P.
0
1
Precisely a week later, the following small notice
appeared. It created immediate controversy, and was
especially not well received within the missionary
community, where Sunday was a day of worship, not
picnics.
And then the new timetable appeared, with its bold
and wicked heading SUNDAY TRAINS.
DAILY BULLETIN:
HONOLULTJ, IL L, 2
,
101
7
22411101t 18, 1889.
W.
O. Elmith
for petitioner; E. Johnson
for
Kamalliwahine (w.,) the mother
of
minor.
28
:
40%
411N
°4/1?
t
h
49/- . btie89'
4r'
?
4
0 feaP/t..
?
t
101 g r
yard. eittode
:tiered and Kitten
OAHU RAILWAY OPENING.
Groat and Vey Event.valeven An.
enrellens••Enfeyed
by Hverybedy.
Mr. II. F. Dillingham, projector
of the Oahu Railway ire Land Com-
pany,
and contractor for building
their railway, introduced a
new
and
Improved style of railway
opening In
the inauguration of the completed
portion of the Pearl Harbor Division
on Saturday last, the Inth inst. The
custom elsewhere is to fill up excur-
sion
trains
with
dignitaries
of state,
politician, and railway
and netts-
paper men, run to a terminal or cen-
tral point, and there entertain the
distinguished excursionists at a ban-
quet,
where
champagne and congra-
tulations are uncorked together.
Mr. Dillingham's more delnocratie
and better wa)
was to give a series
of free, popular
excursions extend-
ing over
the whole day,
calling into
service for that purpose the entire
passenger rolling stock of the road.
The handsotue but not qttitc com-
pleted city terminal station at Iwi-
lei was decorated with the Hawai-
ian, American and 0. IL & L. Co.'s
ttags, floating respectively front the
three towers, that of the corporation
being in
the middle. The Inst con-
sists of three
horizontal strips of
red, blue and red, with the com-
p:1'13's seal in the middle,
making
the whole a
striking and tasteful
design. Before the
initial train
pulled out from the station at 7 a.
in., the platforms were crowded with
pe)ple of all ages, sexes anti nation-
alities, and this condition obtained
all day. Still the arrangements were
so thorough that there was no con-
fusion either in embarking or disem-
barking
4/f
the thousands who had
admission to the round trips hy tick-.
ets marked with the hour for each.
Eleven trains were deepatched
tni
Ilttlavva on the shore of Pearl Har-
bor
and
returned during the day
without the sligliest accident or ini-
pediment. The number of tickets.
issued was n,:1110, but over
four.
thousand people travelled over the
road,
114,
to
prevent disappointment
to aeveral hundreds Of
too late ap-
plicants for tickets, a little judicious
packing on some of tie afternoon
trains procnred ae•onumelation for
the surplus above intlient ed. Mr.
hi r. W. (;.
Ashley,
the company's eecretary, and Mr.
Jennings, superintendent of the line,
gave their personal attention
throughout to the carrying out of
tbe arrangements, to which is due
the highly satisfactory results of the
inaugural celebration.
The passenger engine "Kuala,"
with
Mr. Clark
as
engineer, took the
first train, of which Mr. John Cook-
h.).
was conductor. The
second
train
Was
drawn by (tic
contractor's
working engine, operated by Mr.
Kent, and Mr. La Pierre was its
conductor. The. passenger engine
"Lentil," driven by Mr. Roberts,
was run In conjunction with its sis-
ter locomotive,
sometimes drawing
mid again running as a pilot engine.
Those
who rode in the
first-class
cars, espeeially, were delighted ulth
the smoothness of the motion. Ou
some
of the straighter levels of the
mast a lively speed
was rettelied
particularly on a certain two-mile
stretch. where from thirty to forty
Miles all
hour is
chained to
have been
the
pare. Passengers in
some cases
amused their fellow-excursioniats
by
calling out the sttppositions stations,
also doing the train-boy act of
hawking imaginary newspapers and
refreshments. Mr. A.
F. Cooke gave
a generous
tone of reality to his im-
personation of this character, by dis-
tributing
a hmaslet
of Ingrious
green
grapes amongst a number
of
Ail-
then on one of the ears.

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S50 REWARD
A
111.:1VARD of
$.50 will be
pith! for
the recovery
of the body of Joseph
Van Tamil. who mut lost from
his
balloon beyond the reef
on Saturday
last. FRANK
FROST,
Manager
for
Van Tassel!
Bros.
105 it'
PERSONAL.
Among
the
arrivals by the Austra-
lis
were Mr.
and Mrs. F. R. Dimond
Of
San Francisco. Mr. Dimond is

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Ulm IOW & la Co.
TIME TAVILLs1C:
Trains will lone Honolulu
over die
Oahu Hallrelid & land Co. as follows:
7:30
a.
m
10:00 a. m.,
3:00 p. m.
Arriving at Honolulu:
9:30- a. m., 12:00 m., 4:30 p. tn.
tf.114 If
llkAllAN
OPERA 11011SE
Lessee A Manager : L. J. Levey
OtThursday Eyening, Nov. 21
First Apyearanee or

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THE RAY BROS.,
Ti ii: 411.1:1111ATE1
0
Australian Comedians.
Will
mike
their first
appemance lit
Honolulu on h litsrmluy. Nov.
21st,
and
will sppeir In their Original Iltode,1
Entertainment
written by Unmet Welch.
Eng , and played with them with the
greatest success Ilsri thrbout the Anon/
Hatt Colonies, and entitled

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OUR CUV'NORS I
chavaetora
by (lie RAY
LIMON,
Af
ter whir
?
will he pre4entft1 • local
halite sketch,
System,
River Lagoon and within days of the line's opening
began marketing excursions. Note the hint of limited
availability as an inducement to call now in the story
below, which appeared in the
Advertiser
on November
21, just three days
after
regularly scheduled service had
started.
These excursions had several purposes: they helped
train the employees—from the on-board crews of
engineers, firemen, conductors and brakemen to those
on the ground like ticket agents and mechanics; they
built up an excitement among the public that the
railroad was a reality; and most importantly perhaps,
they brought in
at
least some income.
Some excursions included boat rides, others picnics
and dancing at the soon-to-be-created Remond Grove on
the Pearl City Peninsula. Community groups were
encouraged to plan picnics and parties there, the larger
the better.
A decade later, when the railroad's own Haleiwa
Hotel was a pleasant destination offering people the
North Shore beaches, boating, golf, tennis, and even
hunting, regular "excursion trains" went there and back
several times a week. Since in 1889, there was nothing
yet at the end of the line, Rernond Grove and the boat
rides around the lochs of what would become Pearl
Harbor served the same purpose of attracting riders to
the train as the Haleiwa Hotel later would.
And it was well received by the public. Curiosity
accounted for much of the early ridership. Most islanders
had never ridden a train before, and most had never seen
that area of CYahu. Every penny of income helped OR&L
through this difficult time.
This very early timetable–published in the Tuesday,
November 19 newspapers included a special "Ho for
Halawa and the Lakes of Pearl Harbor" Saturday excur-
sion but no schedule for Sunday, as the trains were idle
that day.
wit float
ai
e
ships
old
.
inla is a
the die-
Id bust-
istering
. suffer-
s. The
oust be
;natural
le
t
t
great
We
g the
ships
k
of for-
ongreas
pd
naval
legisla-
income-
to this
Ring to
Neenger
eubven-
er cent.
pf
years
base of
mailable
)vention•
age and
ith for-
s
head,
fleet of
lnd bet-
e built
.
13 yards
and the
lanadian
service
will ter-
:
untrue.
lard 'gee-
will
stop
steamers
Ike since
will ma-
im
Iftfl
anh-
file IR
Will me
hdu
armor
meat w:
1
played
'
rough
entitled
0
-
Cr
ek
After se
=maw
The
Oh
Lifica
Wad 1
The II
'Teri
And an
has
■••
■■
•••
'rickets Limited to 100 at $2.50
Each.
On Saturday
the O. & R. Co. propose
to give an excursion
by
land
and and sea.
Trains will leave the Station at 115 o'clock
connecting at Ralawa with the Stmr. Ewa.
Early application for tickets should
be made.
?
1194d

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NOTICE.
)9
Ie.
lle
ty
et!
le-
er
th
n-
ot'
ils
tt-
in
I!.
n.
of
to
fe
its
11
4:1
tg
f.
111
ef4
al
in
a-
il,
r,
or
at
to
IC
SO
rst day's free festivities.-,,
,
The writer clearly approves of "Mr. Dillingham's more democratic and better way" to introduce the new road. There were
three locomotives running the trains including "the contractor's working engine.'' That would have been "Kauila," the Baldwin
saddle purchased from the government for Dillingham's birthday ride two months before, as it was owned by Dillingham's
construction company rather than by OR61. In this era before automobiles, speedboats and airplanes, the thirty to forty miles-
per-hour attained on one stretch was likely the fastest most of these people had ever traveled
Above:
The
Daily Bulletin
of Monday the 18th gives a more comprehensive description of the fi
New 24bnatistmento
OAHU RAILWAY AND LAND CO.'s
TIME TABLE.
15
4
And
it
deserip
the Or
and wil
er3
'Ramis
Lest
AR00010386

OAK RAILWAY AND LAND CO. ' S
TIME TABLE.
rpRAINs
WILL
LEAVE tioNoix
over the Oahu Railway Land Cu. SS
follows :
TRAINS
LEAVE Hoxotxtx—S:00 a. tn., 11:00 a. in.
and 3:00 p. tn.
ARRIVE HALAWA-8:45 a. tn.,
11 :45 E. III.
and 3:45 p. tn.
LEAVE HALAWA-9:30 8. in.,
12:30 p. El.
and 4:13 p.
ARRIVE HONOLULU-10:15 a. in.,
1:15 p.
in
and 5:00 p. in.
SUNDAY TRAIN.
LEAVE H0NOLULU-0:30 a.
in— 12:30 p.
in.
and 3:00 p. In.
ARRIVE HALAWA-10:15 a. in., 1:13 p. in.
and 3:45 p.
LEAVE,HALAWA-11:00 E. in.,
1:45 p.
and 4:15 p. m.

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i
titt
li
-
1
give
lyen-
ARRIVE HONOLULU-11:45
a. in., 2:30 p. in.
Ha- ?
and 5:00 p. in.
the
?
12 , 1 1M)
•••••
OD
ened
rhite
Non.
r the
d in
rder
'
the
con-
be
able
'ford
Pen -
It at
fter-
ab-
the
been
re a
U
of
rlin.
rited
ding
That clergyman's opinion was clearly not shared by a
writer in
The Friend,
the publication established by the
Mission here in 1843 (and still being published 160
years later).
Frank Dillingham and the Sunday train issue was
addressed in
The Friend
with the anticipated evangelical
fervor, in an
article headlined
Sunday Amusements:
The
Daily Pacific Commercial Advertiser,
itself owned
by those of sturdy missionary stock, took a secular
position and defended Frank Dillingham and his
operating OR&L on Sundays:
Indeed the Sunday trains continued as long as the
railway was in operation.
Still, it was a struggle for survival. There were few
regular passengers, mostly occasional excursions, includ-
ing those on Sunday. The cargo business was spotty,
People could work on Sunday, of course, if it were a
necessity,
which
is
why that unusual word appeared in the
notice of November 26. Section 1 of the Sunday Law of
1886 explicitly states: "All labor on Sunday is forbidden,
excepting works of necessity or mercy ..."
Many of the very pious believed that encouraging
people to defy—as opposed to deify—the Sabbath by
running trains was not remotely a necessity. Yet it was a
necessity financially, to Frank Dillingham and his
fledgling railway.
As the following item attests, Sunday trains had at
least one supporter in the religious community:
twin
min ?
g, anti Continued until
it
can be ascertained whether Bishop
Willis will not as guardian of the
children.
TIIE time table for the
Sunday
trains over the Oahu railway
will be
found elsewhere. As a clergyman
said the other day, "This is a great
boon for the working classes and
enables them to get into the country
and enjoy pure
fresh
air after a
week's hard work. I heartily approve
of these Sunday trains." Good for
the parson.
•-•-•
?
AT a great Independence Day de-
monstration at Wailuku, Mr. J. W.
Kalua in his speech named, amidst
The recent opening of the Oahu Railroad for
Sunday travel has given great pain to many of our
sober-minded Christian people. That it should be
advocated and undertaken by professedly Christian
men is another painful fact that does not grow any
easier to acknowledge and endure, the longer one
reflects upon its probable signifigance or sees the
actual working of this disregard of the sanctity of
the Sabbath. The only plea is the necessity of
recreation. But recreation is something of higher
meaning and wider scope than amusements. There
is a heedful and proper unbending strain of mind
and body. For fullest development of human energies,
we need periods or rest for refreshment and recu-
peration.
But self-indulgence is not the recreation that
man needs. The relaxing of the claims of religion
and of righteousness is an element of peril and
disaster not of joy and hope whether to the indi-
vidual or to society. It is a great mistake to decry
the Puritan Sabbath of New England society as it
was in the days before manufactures and commerce
broke up its simplicity of life and manners as a day
of gloom and cant. The real fact is that in the
devotion of the Sabbath to special religious priviledges
there is a higher enjoyment than any mere amuse-
ment of self-indulgence can comprehend or measure.
Those are to be pitied who think that in doing
their own pleasure on the Lord's Day there is any
real gain to mind or body. California society does
not furnish a desirable model for those who would
build their homes and mould society in these happy
isles. To inroduce Sabbath-breaking habits is to
throw away a provedential opportunity for securing
a high-toned and blissful state of quiet security for
a restless, lawless turbulent mobocracy. See the
liquor carried and distributed _freely on the Sunday
trains; listen to the vile language and quarrelsome
talk; and say, if you can, that Sunday travel is a
boon and a benefit.
The Sunday trains on the Oahu railroad have
created quite a breeze in our slow community,
which will hurt no one, however, and is likely to
die down a long time before the trains stop run-
ning. The discussion reveals the fact that public
opinion here in our microcosm, as in the wider
world beyond our doors, has outgrown the stern
old Puritan themy of the Sabbath and cast it off
like a garment. It is a "creed outworn"...
The Sunday train is justifiable, not because
people desire it merely but because the demand is
a reasonable one, one which it is a service to the
public to meet and not an offence to be apologized
for and condoned. The desire for an outing on the
part of people whose only fire hours are on Sunday
is a legitimate one. A colth stiff and silent Sabbath
which lays an icy hand on every warm, _fresh
impulse of the spirit is something to be deplored,
something to be rid of...
To tell the truth, our Sunday law is morally
obsolete. It is or ought to be a dead letter. The
conscience of the count?), has outgrown it, and it
does not meet with the approval of the best minds
of the nation, whether in the church or out of it.
It is not in harmony with the most advanced
religious thought of the day.
To
arrest a Chinaman
for working in his own vegetable garden on Sunday
is religious persecution, and all the fine names in
the world can never make it any thing else.
Doubtless such laws were the work of good and
conscientous man, but their conceptions of the
Sabbath are hopelessly out of date ...
It is just as proper for
my
neighbor who need
rest, change and _fresh air to seek these things at
Pearl River on Sunday as it is for me to go to
church. He ought to have his opportunity as well
as I mine.
bananas and
rice headed to the markets and mills in
Honolulu, and building materials headed on the way to
the sugar plantations, mills and buildings, as well as to
the homes at Pearl City. Yet Dillingham soldiered on
with great determination.
His steam shovel arrived in late November and the
railroad was closed for a day to haul it from Honolulu to
Moanalua. There it scooped dirt to landscape Samuel
Damon's gardens and load it aboard railcars to go down
and fill in the fishponds by the main station.
Just
as he did with his hardware and dairy companies
before this, Dillingham faced economic peril by expand-
ing. Already deeply in debt both personally and corpo-
rately, Dillingham sailed to San Francisco to inspect
some narrow gauge equipment and materials being sold
by the San Francisco
8c
North Pacific Railway Company,
which was converting to standard gauge.
On January 13, 1890, Dillingham issued them the
following bid:
I hereby agree to take the following upon terms
stated, as soon as it can be delivered:
No. I locomotive at $2100.00
No. 3 locomotive at $3500.00
220 tons iron at $32.00 per ton
4 switches, complete at $40.00 each
The iron was clearly rails, as he then adds:
Also all fish plates, bolts and spikes which may be
saved when taking up the 220 tons of iron at 1 1
2
cts.
per lb. Provided, and it is understood that i f I take the
entire lot of "T" rails, I shall receive a rebate equal to
$2.00 per ton, for the 220 tons purchased.
Railcars were likely also being offered for sale, but
by that time Dillingham had already hired master car-
builder John
A. Hughes to design and construct rolling
stock in OR8cUs own shops.
Once the locomotives—both Baldwins—landed,
they received their new OR&L identities: No. 1, an
0-4-2T originally called
Sonoma,
became
Goliath
No. 8
(numbered for son Harold's age). The larger of the two,
the 4-4-0 No. 3, had earlier been
General Vallejo
and
became the famous
Lanakila,
celebrated in
mele
(song)
and
hula.
Meanwhile, George Denison and his track crews
bead
from
o last
ripe
lasses
Imber
p0011
noon
will
them
bully
Th
to be
of tit
are a
the C
back
gram
Hien
Horn
prote
impo
30
?
31
AR00010387

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H RAILWAY AND

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LAND Co.
vivar'
?
r:N1
7
17
-
N
7
-1 ;•\
TREs •
ON ALT REM.OAID G
ROVE
Above:
This 1896 ad is an interesting snapshot of lift along the tracks. It includes the only
?
identified image of Remond
Grove and a "Pineapple Ranch."
Above:
Frank Dillingham poses confidently beside one of the Baldwin locomotives that finally made him and OR61, successfid
The stress to achieve that success led to several serious bouts of depression, however, and one in 1904 was likely servere enough to
be diagnosed today as a nervous breakdown. He entered a sanitarium in California to recuperate. By that time Walter, even at a
young age an astute businessman, was available to take over and hold the debt-ridden business together while his father recovered.
33
kept pushing the line out. There was a need to get to
'Ewa so the new sugar company could build their town,
laborers' camps and the new mill. While the first crop
was two years away, the infrastructure had to be con-
structed, and almost all of the pieces were transported
there via OR&L.
Johnny Wilson was a three-time mayor of Honolulu.
After high school he ran away on a whaling voyage to the
Arctic and "got a job as brush cutter and chainman for
Mr. Kleugel, the engineer for OR&L" when he returned.
Wilson later was a member of Stanford's first class
and went on the build the Pali Highway and the roadbed
around Ka`ena Point for OR&L.
By June 1890 the tracks had reached Honouliuli and
soon they were complete to the Ewa Mill.
For the next five years, money was extremely tight,
and the next target—Wai`anae—was fifteen miles of
expensive construction away. In 1891 King Kalakaua
died and the crown passed to his sister, Lili'uokalani,
whose efforts to restore power to what was by then a
watered-down monarchy infuriated many businessmen.
They formed a secret cabel and—with no little help from
United States Foreign Minister John L. Stephens and a
company of U.S. Marines—overthrew the Queen in
1893. Political intrigue and uncertainty dried up the
supply of investment cash for a few years.
32
AR00010388

The First Honolulu Station ?
1.1
Hard as it may be to conceive today, in the 1880s
the entire area near `A`ala Park and the train station was
under water. The original 1889 OR&L station was built
on stilts (visible on the left side of the large image on
facing page), and the train tracks ran on hastily-placed fill.
The story below, dated August 23, 1889, raves about
the beautiful new building which was taking shape. The
winning construction bid was $1125 from F. Harrison.
The main station of the Oahu railroad
will be a magnificent building. It will
be 106 feet long, 37 feet wide, and two
stories high. Each and veranda will
be 38 feet long and 27 feot wide. There
will also be a tower and ornamental roof,
and the whole lower story will be de-
voted to the traffic department.
Ills Majesty the King visited the U. S.
warship Nipsic yesterday afternoon,
during the reception held on board that
vessel. Ills Majesty Wag received, on
hie return from the vessel, by the Howie-
bold Guard which was drawn up by the
side of the vesnel. The royal ties waved
at the main of the Nipsic during the
Eines visit.
The dredge is now picking up unsav-
ory mud near the Fish Market wharf;
but the stuff makes excellent material
for the site
of the new market, and loses
its disagreeable perfume when exposed
to gig sir
tor a few
dam The newly
obe
this
nob
cipl
row
wan
Fre
moo
of
cola
yea
will
the
COB
P08
f t,t
eri
like
Ufa
him
arm
kno
"2
?
SO
?
SO
?
411
Below:
The caption below this photo in an old album reads "Oahu Prison from King Street in 1870. Fishponds where the Oahu
Railroad Station stands." The July 27, 1889
Advertiser
noted: "Plans have been approved by which the main depot will be
placed 180 feet from King street in what is now a fish-pond dividing Oahu prison from the royal stables. A large portion, if not
alh of this extensive fish-pond will be filled in without delay, and this substantial and eligible building ground, artificially
formed, will become of great value by close proximity to the main depot buildings."
34
Above:
OR&L's main station in the early days of the operation. The company flag is flying from the central tower and is flanked
by Hawaiian and American flags. The first-class passenger cars from Carter Bros. seem a much larger scale than the small
Baldwin locomotive and tender. Other buildings have already sprung up on filled land
mauka
of the station.
Below:
OR&L station at left (with tower). Note also the Ciry Mill sign at lower right center. That company has been in business
since 1899, owned the entire time by the Ai family. The old fishponds were solid ground by the time this picture was taken.
35
AR00010389

1
36
Above:
C.A. "Cabby" Brown (right) hosts a lu'au. Frank Dillingham is two seats down, followed by his children. Brown owned
the Ti land ofWaipro, through which the railroad passed.
Above:
Purchased for $2100 from the San Francisco 6- North Pacific Railway Company, this Baldwin served OR&L as
Goliath
No. 8, primarily as a work engine.
Below:
This locomotive went through a series of name and number changes during its long existence. It was built by Baldwin in
1878 for the San Francisco
er
North Pacific Railway Company, where it served as No.3,
General Vallajo.
When that line shifted
to standard gauge in 1890, the engine was sold to Dillingham for $3500. It was re-badged the
Lanakila
("Victory'). At some
point it was apparently re-named
B.F. Dillingham
and numbered 45 (Dillingham's age at time of purchase). It appears here on
the turntable in 1923---fifty-five years after creation—sparkling like new, a tribute to the devoted men who cared for it.
Below:
Sergeant Dillingham as a member of the Honolulu Citizens Guard, during the Republic of Hawaii era.
37
AR00010390

als
t,885 00
— —
1,183 00

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--
279 75
_—
al from
he Ala-
t :
0Ahu.
rtn the
the As-
Aida.
1EM.
721 tiw
Day
A,
I GRAPE
mod on
lore
of
'les
1
orders.
Day
SION

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alub
City,
28th.
lad of tlw
720 3t
1'.
S. Doors Open at 7:30; Perform-
1111e0
commences at 8 o'clock sharp.
Programme to be published later.
711)

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GREAT LAND SALE
AT

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PEA RL CITY,

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Saturday, Nov. 29th.
"MI Aboard for Pearl City!"
.
1 RAINS WILL LEAVE
111 K. III ))101,11.1'
?
Vilo IN FOlt
PEA111.
orty,
tin siottorday, Nov.
211t1i. 81 8:4A, 11:15, la: 1:1, 11
:45
A. M. unit
1:45 r. m.
kir To give eyeryboaly a 0111111•4*
ooalw a dna! Inspection of the Very De-
slrahle Property to be sold on that day.
Ilte.ses mill meet every train at Pearl
VII) -dation for accommodation of pas.
sengeis t
loo desk e lii see fluor of the
tom n site.
kjr
1.11111
.
11
a
III
Iii
PI %V.!
it
tin Pa% I-
oy the Propiletor II(
this
jili11111i1111
lit
t iithth I.
?
m.
THE SALE WILL COMMENCE
AT t ?
P M .
goy-I In the III% of sale *peelii tlehets
for the tunnel hip ?
lie
ittr.tlet1 %% hit
hum It etttliton
ottowhool for the HUM
of 81.
ge r
ThI101. t 1111
plefer to early their
lunch or mak• nth, r at rank:ements
5.1111
'Illy lit kl'IS fill
doe roma, trip at Ille
regular exenrslon tato s (no et.ist.).
aar- The prlee of Ihe tickets will be
refunded to each purchaser of land, at,
thu tittle
111
*dr
A Qpeclal Train will leave Pearl
City at 3 o'cloek e. m., on )1ov. 2h It.
outlying In Monolith' In Ilme for the
IIts'.s.Ii,t III loots'.
B. F. DILLINGHAM,
()totem, Manager 0. It. & 1.. Co.
718 1w

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FOR SA LE
---
ell/1,1
1
11111A Safely Illeyele, In good
14..I 01.111.r ?
Male
cheap. Apply lids
714 2w
ifavin
"Lima
of that
lit rec.
ant pr
the 1ii
hope
tomer
Nov
NNW
Wro
Br
o
ile
r
&
Ho
t
Wa
te
r
At-
4.
1 0.
Conpat II
Sir
W h 01
gor
Mt
31•90
Above:
Number 85 stops at Pearl City around 1944.
39

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OR&L's Own Development: Pearl City ...
38
What if you built a cargo railway and nobody
showed up with cargo to ship? That was essentially what
happened after 0R8EL opened in November 1889.
Dillingham knew before he ordered his first sheet of logo
stationery, or first length of rail, that the first few years
would be a fiscal nightmare.
He was, by all accounts, a born optimist, and he had
confidence that the initial crop of sugar from Ewa
Plantation would save the line. In the meantime he
would need to generate some cash. Running trains on
Sunday, in defiance of the law and the edicts of his own
church, came during the second week of operation, and
was immediately popular.
Creating Remond Park, with its picnic areas and
brightly-lit dance pavilion, was another great idea to lure
some passenger dollars aboard. Running excursion trains
out to Pearl Harbor and then offering boatrides around
the lochs on the steamer
Ewa
added a unique experience,
as did offering group charters on the train.
Leasing land for short-term crops like bananas and
rice was a third venture, as these came to market quickly
—certainly much quicker than sugar or pineapple.
But certainly the biggest venture to bring in cash to
the strapped railway was the his creation of Hawaii's first
planned suburban development, Pearl City.
Like everything else he touched, Frank Dillingham
did Pearl City right. This was not a typical blind devel-
opment, where lots were staked out, but no improve-
ments were started before there were enough deposits in
the till to cover the costs. The area was traditionally the
district of Manana, but Dillingham held a contest to
name his new city. The winner selected was Pearl City,
and the public also named the main street, Lehua.
One review in
Paradise of the Pacific
notes that
Dillingham "has laid out Pearl City, and provided for
future contingencies as if he expected to make it his
home for the next two hundred years."
Another, in the
Daily Bulletin,
headlines that Pearl
City is "the result of [Dillingham's] enterprise and pluck"
and ends with the reviewer saying that, despite being "a
poor man," he has personally selected a lot to bid on at
the next auction.
Yet glowing reports of "a beautifully situated town
with an abundant supply of pure artesian water, with
wide streets laid out," did not seem to affect the buying
public, and auction sales were not brisk.
AR00010391

MAP OF TH
E
A
o
h,,k
u
ISLVND OF 0.1111
SHOWING LOCATioN
ElF
KAHUFAl
.
PJ
A
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1
0
1
%Oct
'4,0
20
,404
4,
,A
I t
o ,11,-, 0
00
, 1
wistpo_.0%.*0
4
10
4
ot* 04
1
14
leskoo
t
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o,
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v
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1, >
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.
te
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?
,„160
4040
To
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1, too*
(
,
tOrkts
_ iik
w 7
‘‘
,

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I II°
Ir j
?
‘‘•
ote
.0
?
!11JL ,OA
'
0.4k1
frA
1
0
Mr-Ira,
w
i o "1..- r , ....V•
So 1
ik
4•0V'
.60..
V*
„41.
*#
?
Vs*
V
\
ifral
ot
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a
tillottitsiA**.
orminomink
,
I
t
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414
\
447140
.••
•••••
-
---- ?
ao
....a... a. as
.... • ?
.... ?
•••
••• •
0

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?
I SIAN D OF
Oahu
?
.
LAID OUT BY
ME
41
-
way
SCALE OF FEE
KLUEGEL,eHIEF ENGINEER:-B.E DIWNGO
,
GE
and
-T -
RAL MANAGER.
SCHMIDT LABEL& UTHO.CO.
40
?
41
PEARL HARBOR
AR00010392

30
d.
time been one of the attractions of the
locality It was built for the use of
picnickers and dancing parties by the
railroad company. It is seventy feet
square, open on all sides, and is lighted
by electricity. Surrounding it is a well-
kept lawn, with a playing fountain in
front, and provided with swings,
croquet games, etc. During an evening
fete at the pavilion it is brilliantly
lighted, and gorgeously decorated,
presenting an animated spectacle.
In the all important matter of water
supply, Pearl City can make especial
boast, having in sight facilities for
supplying a city of 10,000 inhabitants.
There is now an artesian well which
flows to a height of 28 feet, and has a
capacity, when pumped, of 2,000,000
gallons per day. This will be pumped
into a reservoir
100
feet high, and be
used to supply the peninsula.
There is another reservoir on the
more elevated ground, 200 feet above
sea level, with a capacity of one and a
half millions of gallons, which can be
increased to 16,000,000 as soon as
necessary This is supplied from moun-
tain streams.
The natural attractions and
beauties of the place are sufficient to
recommend it to persons in search of
the most delightful home on earth. The
railroad offers to take residents of Pearl
City to or from Honolulu for ten cents,
and enables Honolulu business men
there to live at Pearl City. All the
property intended to place on the
market, will be sold before any decisive
steps are taken by the United States
with reference to Pearl Harbor, and as
any advantage that might accrue to
Pearl City from the occupation of the
harbor by the United States is really a
matter of speculation, it might as well
not be discussed.

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ITLY 2, 1894.
Homes at Pearl City!
~lap
0
1
/ OAAV RAILROAD
A
(-ANS CO-
I .
A. 0,4•••7415041
rol
04.4
ve•
4'
44I14141
?
•1111
oe.eaes
?
serer
eiteMettr.
a
.11
1
A AO CIO
Ojpii
anNOP CS TA
rir
role'
i ?
POSMID
actfarlIMC4110•1
I ay.
w
ee •
0
?
a
TILE OASET RAILWAY is LAND CO.
or..
the Petals Another Crest Oppertealq to Nears Iteseii la One er
neat Dellsatial loiesAltles to bo rimed Is tbe Paradise et the Peelle.
As a bealthly resort—PearlCity has already established - ett enviable
l
?deny good citisene
thla commanity
have aperienced the wonderfol= " p an
ro:
duoed by • few days sojourn in that dry, cool atmosphere, and !give grateful Watt.
mony to the relief they have almost Instantly pined from Welt and long
continued attacks of asthma.
Physicians acquainted with the climate of Pesci
City recommend it u a natural sanitarium.

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The Water Supply is Ample.
And can ba increased to meet We need' al a population squat lo the limed.
city in the world.
Pus. A. B. LTOXS of Oahu College Is our authority
for stating that thee water
supply la the purest yet discovered in tido country.
SPECIAL
INDUCEMENTS TO EARLY
srimmte
For ninety days from date we will sell um ow mom mini favorable to boaa.
fide settlers. For • term of three months from data, lumber and all buildlog
rids will be •uppliedi and delivered at Pearl City at mush lower price than ere
before obtained.
For further particulars, call at this office or on any of the lumber
dssiots
In
this city. Those who now own lots u well ae those who propose to bosoms
residents of that growinpt city, will do well to embus. WIN copped:into% Maass
who avail themselves of this rWer, within the time named, will be entitled, toi
sod
will receive the following benefits:
For a term of ten years, this Company will may nett
reddest sad tbdr
families from Pearl City to Honolulu In the morning (arriving • little
Wars
seven
o'clock], and from Honolulu to Purl City in theevening (leaving
limo.
lulu station a little after Ave o'clock), for ten cents each way, a rat* los Wan
ea
cent per mile. The rates on all other peneenger train running daring the day
It night will be
1% cents per mile Ant clue and I wet per mile
mond slam
A Food school la about to be opened in
a
the Peninsula, in the fine.e, new
school-house erected by Mr. J. T.Watethous. Reoldenta livbg at
belebta, [above Pearl City station] and thole laving homes at the Paomia,
will be allowed to ride free on regular trains between
Paul City dodoes
to and from the Peadadda.
Those who want to cautious to send lb* children to mho* 111
liteettga
can have transportation on all regular
tied= to bad
from Pearl City. k Ws
purpose of attending school M Ave cents each way for each pupil.
Tbb equal
to 24 to 88 miles ilde for ten cents.
Rood 'Mourned.
lor
those dairies to secure homes in
this eossIty
bass
nom Wore been offend to the public.
nip compost:
rstrbe I
masted been abroad to nano the prke of all tbdra
fl#
sold bald
in that
Should a clearance sale be made to • "Wigs% no opoodemity Mee
ibs tow
ent would arab tour tor the yerchent elbows. as Peed City.
"A. word to the wise is aufnclent."
OAHU 'RAILWAY & LAND CO.,
8038 ?
LIB F.
Duissessom, Gems'
Kamm
43
From the July 1892 issue of
Paradise of the Pacific:
A "PEARL!' OF THE PACIFIC
Another Adjunct to All the Comforts of Home
A Haven of Health
Pearl City, on the Island of Oahu and a few miles
distant from the city of Honolulu, is one of the most
delightful spots on the Island, and lately made accessible
to home-seekers by the building of the Oahu railroad.
It is no longer a project of the railroad company, as
past publications on the Hawaiian Islands have spoken of
it, but is now a beautifully situated town with an abun-
dant supply of pure artesian water, with wide streets laid
out, with a substantial station erected, with several
elegant modern residences already built, and with all the
improvements necessary to make it the Monterey of
Honolulu going on as rapidly as a large force of work-
men can push them to completion.
The Oahu Railway and Land Company who
founded the towm did not, as does the average townsite
company, invite the public to buy their lots on the
strength of what they proposed to do.
They did not lay out a town on paper and say a
town would be built, an abundance of water could be
had, and that they intended to do thus and so on. Not
they: they made the improvements first, then invited the
public to take a free ride in elegant passenger coaches, on
a thoroughly equipped railroad, through a delightful
stretch of country, and over as fine a roadbed as money
and scientific engineering could build, to see what had
been done.
Then, after the public had been afforded ample
opportunity to satisfy themselves, the lots were sold at
auction to the highest bidder.
There have been up to the present writing three of
these sales, and 250 lots out of about 800 were sold, the
proceeds in all amounting to $97,000. The other lots,
excepting a number which the Company will not put
upon the market, are still for sale. A brief description of
the town and its improvements will here be of interest.
Pearl City consists of 2200 acres of land, which was
owned in fee simple by the Oahu Railway and Land
Company, 18,000 acres adjoining which is held by the
same company under a fifty-year lease, and is being
sublet for fruit growing purposes. Three companies have
recently incorporated, two of them with a capital of
$30,000 each, and have rented a choice portion of this
land, which will be planted principally in bananas and
pine apples.
The 2200 acres which the town proper comprises
includes the whole of the beautiful peninsula, extending
into the harbor, and the lots on the mainland, shown on
the map, the latter of which are on a gradual slope of
land inclining toward the mountains, and commanding
a most entrancing view of the harbor on one side, and a
panorama of surpassing loveliness on the other.
The site of Pearl City has long been a favorite spot
for picnickers, where boating, bathing and fishing can be
enjoyed under the most favorable circumstances. A good
breeze is always blowing from the ocean, and the harbor
is continually dotted with sails. The temperature of the
water is perfect for bathing all the year around, and the
followers of gentle Isaak here find facilities for indulging
in their favorite pastime. Here, in fact, are all the advan-
tages that it would seem possible for Nature to bestow on
one locality, and there is surely no spot on earth where
life can be enjoyed mid more pleasurable surroundings
than at Pearl City.
The town was laid out by a scientific engineer, under
the general direction of Mr. B.F. Dillingham, to whose
energy and indefatigable efforts Pearl City owes its
existence. This gentleman's extraordinary foresight and
wisdom do not require to be referred to here. They are
too well appreciated in Honolulu: suffice it to say that he
has laid out Pearl City, and provided for future contin-
gencies as if he expected to make it his home for the next
two hundred years.
Every natural advantage has been turned to use. A
block facing the harbor has been reserved for a grand
hotel, and in front of it is a large fish pond enclosed from
the bay. Another five acre block adjoining the hotel
grounds is a park reservation, a natural depression in
which will be made a miniature lake for children to sail
their boats upon. An artesian well that flows 4,000,000
gallons a day, and which was used formerly for irrigating
rice fields, but whose water is too brackish for drinking
purposes, will be used as a source of supply for a swim-
ming tank, 50 x 100 feet in dimensions, which is to be
erected. The pavillion at Remond Grove has for some
The pavilion at Remond Grove has for some time been one of the attractions. It
was built for the use of picnickers and dancing parties by the railroad company.
42

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John
Aloysius Hughes
Master Car Builder
John Hughes was born in Ireland in 1860. He
attended the common schools there and learned
navigation from Brother John P. Holland, later the
inventor of the submarine.
Hughes started work as an apprentice ship
builder at age 13 and made his first sea voyage
in
1879 as a ship's carpenter. He eventually worked
his way
up
to second mate, but some six years
later, after sailing much of the world, he quit the
sea in San Francisco. There he married and went to
work for the San Francisco Bridge Company, the
largest railroad builder on the West Coast (and
supplier of the steamshovel Dillingham purchased
in early 1889).
In
August of that year, Hughes was
hired away by Dillingham for Oahu Railway as the
line's master car builder.
Like others before and since, he came for a
year and stayed a lifetime. Except for ORtid's first
small order of cars from Carter Brothers--whose
assembly in Honolulu he supervised --Hughes
designed almost every freight and passenger car
which ever ran on the line, as well as the standard
gauge cars Dillingham ran in Hilo.
John Hughes was also active in the commu-
nity, serving as a trustee of Palama Settlement and
a member of the Terriorial Legislature in 1907.
sammoil
FISNEgMAN
CASTING Ni IS NETS--

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EARLY DAYS

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Y JOHN H UGHES
IN PEARL
AS TOLD TO
RA
CITY
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MIK Wall • MU 24, 1936
ki.F A century ago
Pearl Harbor was a
peaceful, sequestered
lake, almost as peace.
the upper reaches of
are Amazon. The only
that disturbed its
ral solitude were an oe-
t1 native fisherman
;
his nets, a sailing boat
iss load of pleasure
1, and a solitary
shark
king to his pen.
se hierarchy orf Hawai-
di the shark god and
ideas of
Pele held high
mored place.
'Twas in
a at Pearl Harbor the
God kept rendezvous
ade his home.
Pear! Harbor today is a
great naval base. It is an
American western frontier
fortress on a Hawaiian isle.
In its landlocked waters my-
sting an
area of almost 10

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miles there will soon be an-
chorage and safety for our
satire fleet.
* *
In 1842 President Tyler
pve notice to all European
nations that the United States
would never consent to their
occupying Hawaii or estab-
lishing a naval base there,.
This friendly act of the great
republic saved Hawaiians
from becoming
the
vassals of
some rasping monarchial
power.
In 1876 King
Kalakaua
siped the treaty ceding Pearl
Harbor to the United States.
That treaty ushered in the
dawn of a new era
for Ha-
waii—an era of more friendly
intercourse and financial sta-
bility. In that year our ex-
ports to all countries was Si,.
000,000 and 15 years later
they heti increased to S15,-
000,000, all due to the friend-
ship and policy of the United
States.
In 1889 U. F. Dillingham
started building a railroad,
creating agricult ura 1 industries
along its right-of-way, and re-
claiming tide lands for a
waterfront terminal; projects
tint made possible the con-
version
or
barren lands into
the highly productive fields
of sugar cane and pineapples
that now cover the Island and
which are primarily the warp
sad wood of our business life.
The first 12
miles
of the
railroad were known as the
"Pearl Harbor Division and
its terminal was at Pearl City.
Here on a level countryside
extending from an elevated
plateau in Mannana to the
shores of Pearl Harbor, he
had his engineers lay out a
townsite
with streets, avenues,
parks, school grounds and a
modern water system. To en-
courage home seekers and
small farmers, , its land was
offered at exceptionally easy
terms. Speaking about those
terms, a daily paper said:
"He (Mr. Dillingham) could
scarcely offer any greater in-
ducements, unless it be to
build houses, find tenants,
and insure the payment of
rents to the purchaser's,"
I was one of several em-
ployes to whom Mr. Dilling-
ham generously gave acre
lots
in fee simple. I built a
bungalow on it. and with my
family
we became residents
of Pearl City. To celebrate
the event, I planted a banyan
tree that was given to me by
my friend, Curtis P. Iaukea,
a
Hawaiian gentleman, and
one of the few remaining his-
toric links binding the new
to the old Hawaii.

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* * *
In the early
90's, Pearl
City was a growing and inter-
esting little country town.
Several trains ran daily be-
tween it and Honolulu. Ex-
cursion trains filled with pass-
engera from Honolulu and
way stations were there on
Sundays. Almost everyone
was travelling on the railway.
It was something new and the
fares were low.
In Pearl City and its sub-
urbs there were many Hawai-
ian families. They lived a
simple, kindly, carefree life,
and were generous to a fault.
On their kuleanas they raised
sufficient bananas, taro and
\ --um)
?
GAT
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PSIONISI1S ON
fumpAys
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v.whokosmile
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cr
WPM CAPEPErIAVE
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A
S511Tirt
f
ILEEPS C{101.ERA
OUT
OF peat.
C.1T1
would be. On seeing
lite
first
train approach, the guard got
on the track and made fran-
tic swinging motions with his
gun. The engineer, seeing the
moving figure in front of his
train, thought it prudent to
stop
and
inquire. On learning
what it was all about,
he
just
hoarded his
train and went
on his way.
o
potatoes not only to
Ay their own families hut
the families of visitors
friends. Those were their
yon days. The politician,
one with the friendly
e,
warm hand clasp and
t.what windy verbiage had
yet arrived.
n
the lower lands around
.1 City and along the rail.
track for teveraL miles,
taro and bananas were
,
n in profustion. The cub
ton of rioe, then a major
',try, was controlled by
tese. They plowed their
g with water buffaloes
wooden plows. If their
loch were primitive they
red patiently and faith-
.
every day in the
year,
pt on Chinese New Year.
that day, their homes
thrown open to rich and
for all to partake of
hospitality.
t the upper lands of
1 City there were three
apple farms. The man.
of one of them was C.
J.
arthy, in later years our
rnor. The pineapple in.
ry was then in its in-
and there was much
Illation as to what its fit.
would he. On Sundays
holida.e the stockholders
their friends visited the
s in crowds. On those
the managers; were kept
lie jump entertaining the
us, explaining the
tint of water required for
ation and the difference
•een
the smooth cayenne
other varieties.
nose men were the pio.
s
in the pineapple huhu).
They labored from sun.
to sunset, and then passed
Today the grass is
green
m their graves and sugar
waves its tassels to the
Is
above the fields upon
h they labored.
* * *
te of the first railway of-
is at Pearl City was
Law-
e
Kip, a lawyer and a
her of an old, distin-
led San Franciaco
fam-
Mr. Kip came to Ilona
on his honeymoon. Ile
I it,
remained,
and got a
as ticket agent at Pearl
. One day a dog fight,
to the railroad depot,
e
in on his quiet, unob-
ye honeymoon and from
st an unknown quantity
ade
him the best
known
and most
popular man in the
village. This dog fight severed
friendships of many years
and so enraged the owner of
the beaten dog that he ap-
pealed to the court for dant.
ages. Mr.
Kip was engaged by
the other side.
On the day of the trial the
little courthouse was crowded
to suffocation. All were amt.
ions to hear the San Fran.
risco lawyer. The judge en-
tered—a just and kindly Ha.
waiian—and took his
seat
with
more than the
usual dig-
nity. The
court officials, all
Hawaiians, being seated and
ready for huskiness, the ease
was called. Mr. Kip arose, an
imposing figure, and,
amidst
a silence like the tomb. he
made an oration on A Dog
that literally swept the autli-
env'
off their feet. It won the
case for his client and was
the principal topic of con-
versation in the village for
many m o on..
* * *
Daring the political tur-
moil in 1893 we organized the
Pearl City Citizens' Guard. It
mustered about two dozen
members. amongst w h o
in
were natives, part.natives and
representatives of a I in o
P t
every country
in Europe, in-
chiding Ireland and Pales.
time. Our captain
WilA
a geni-
al. heavily idtiskered veteran
of the Franco.Prussian war of
1869 Our lieutenant was a
stalwart young American; for
Pergriant
and caterer we had
a
conquistadore
from the
Spani-h Main.
The youngest
and niot alert member of the
contpany was part-Scott-IL He
rode like a conlmy and
acted
as scout. Our arms consisted
chiefls nf cavalry titles and
rice.hird guns. Mine was a
relic of the
Civil
War.
A (ter
several weeks of
lmightfv
tramping
over quiet
country roads, I was
aroused
early one morning lw
the
noise of galloping hoofs and
then a hurried knocking at
the door. It was a "call to
arm "
The messenger noti-
fied toe to report immediate-
ly at headquarters. as a large
body of
men was coming
through
the Leleihua Pass
from
the direction
of Weis-
Ina. Now, to stop those men
from going to Honolulu was
what our company must do.
My thoughts on soldiering
in those days centered around
the Stars end Stripes leading
in some great cause, where
war drums beat and battle
flags unfurled—hut this was
different.
On reaching headquarters,
I found the company all
ready for the fray. Our cap-
tain radiated military ardor
and seemed to have sensed
the combat from afar." He
ordered us to
fall in line and
meet
the
enemy in platoons.
This order did not -meet with
unanimous approval because
most of us knew nothing
about platoons.
There fol-
lowed then a discussion on
military laws and military
tactics. Some wild
and wool.
Icy suggestions were made. It
was finally decided to hold a
parley with the enemy.
Whilst the war council was
in
session our scout, on his
own initiative, mounted his
horse and rode out to
recon-
noitre the approaching me-
ttle.
On hia return, he report-
ed that the only "enemy" in
sight was several Chinese
fishermen taking their fish,
in wagons, to the Honolulu
Market.
The next and last time that
our company met we were in
full military attire — guns,
cartridges and belts — and
every member answered the
rolbeall. This meeting was a
"farewell to arms." A Hono-
lulu artist placed
us
in line
beneath the spreading fronds
of a travellers': palits—a pas-
toral setting — and took our
picture. A copy of it is in the
Archives of Hawaii.
Two member. of the com-
pany are still alive and still
live at Pearl City.

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* * *
Under the monarchy until-
hers of lepers took refuge
in the mountains, preferring
death there to
exile on
Mo-
lokai. One of the first things
the provisional government
did was to gather in those
people and enforce time segre-
gation law.
In the mountains back of
Pearl City., two lepers made
their home. Both always car-
ried
rifkr•
Ana httih
were
"dead shots." On Sunday
evenings they came down to
Pearl City to visit their fain-
Mee and get a supply of poi
for the ensuing week. One of
them was married and had
two children, a boy and a
girl, from four to
six years.
The married one, on reaching
his
home, placed his rifle be-
hind the only door the cabin
had. He then went outside to
play with his children. As the
sun went
down, he took them
inside and, on closing the
door, he saw his rifle lying on
the floor, broken in two. Be.
lieving that his wife had done
this to betray hint and have
him captured, he killed her.
At the railroad depot on
Monday morning there was
quite a crowd waiting for the
early train. In their midst
were a little boy and a little
girl who stood there, hand in
hand, and looked as if they
did not know where they
were or what was passing on
around them. Their father
had sent them from his home
—for safety—as he intended
to die there rather than sur-
render.
It was a tragic event that
marred
the beauty and soli.
tude of that peaceful village
on that and the preceding
day.
The man's humble cabin
lay near the center of a small
valley that was almost
sur-
roun
ded by hills. On those
hills, protected by
shrubbery,
the sheriff posted his force.
and, on the leper's refusing a
call to surrender, firing was
started on the solitary occil.
pant in the cabin below. The
fire was returned. Just how
he did it with a broken
gun
was something of a mystery.
It was almost noon when fir.
ing from the cabin ceased. On
entering it, the sheriff and
hie posse found the body of
the man lying alongside that
of his wife.
The. other leper, surren.
dere', a few days after the
death of his friend.
On the morning that he
was taken from Pearl City to
Honolulu. extra
ears had to
be coupled on to
the regular
train to accommodate the
crowds that wanted to hid
hint
good-bye before
he was
taken to Molokai. When the
train arrived in Honolulu an-
other large gathering was
waiting for him
there.
They
stood in line beside the cars
and, as he passed them on
his way to the.
street,
all who
could. shook him hr
the hand
and many embraced him.
I saw him, young and alert
march through the greeting
throng
with
a strong
and
rapid stride and
with head
erect, like the
victor in a
fight. And I saw him—in pa.
thetie vanity—raise his
right
hand to trim a few straggling
hairs
an almost invisible
moustache. Just then he
had
leasurable thrill before the

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am
n fell.
* 4 *
n July, 1894,
the Republic
of Hawaii joined the family
of nations. Its Constitution
was drawn up at a convention
of elected delegates
from all
the islands.
The election of
our del*.
gate took place at Pearl City.
The
plantation
manager and
Ewa contingent came there
by
train. Previous to the
meeting, the chief engineer of
Ewa, a man then and for
many
years after, one of our
best people, said
to me,
"Have you a candidate?" I
answered "No." He
then said,
"Our manager has one and
he
has been teaching his
men
how
to
vote for him. He
is
not my choice; if you will
nominate a good man I will
vote for him."
The manager's candidate
had been involved in a petty
lawsuit, which, he lost. Be-
cause of this lawsuit,
he was
not my choice either.
When the meeting got
down to business, the
man.
seer nominated his choice for
delegate; the
nomination was
duly seconded
and then a ma
tion was
made that
the nomi.
nations
close. The Ewa peo-
ple
were anxious to
finish up
and go home.
In the interlude, having
caught the chairman's
eye.
I
arose and nominated Jim Tor.
hert. Torbert lived
in Pearl
City with his
mother and his
sister. Ile was,
in
every
way,
an ideal citizen, but the
nom.
nation of Torbert was not
the
simple thing I thought it
would be; on the contrary
it
came, like an exploding
bomb
and created so much tumult
that the chairman had much
difficulty in calling a recess.
My entrance into politics
was
a
stormy
one. I had an.
ticipated a pleasant evening
with friends; instead. here I
was, enthroited in
strife and
turmoil and a bitterness
I
failed to understand, yet,
whatever the result
would be,
I felt satisfied that Jim Tor-
bert was not only the
logical
candidate but also the better
man. In the balloting Torbert
was beaten by only four votes.
Several years after the in.
eidents recorded here,
Joe
Cooke of Alexander & Bald.
win's requested me to make
an estimate on building some
rolling stock for the Pnunene
Plantation. I went to Pun.
nexte. Upon meeting one of
the officials there he said,
"Hello, John; what are
you
doing here?" I told him.
"Why!" he said, "the man-
ager has already arranged for
the building of those cars."
The former manager of Ewa
was
then manager of Puu-
nene.
* * *
In 1905, cholera
in
a mild
ferns made its appearance in
Honolulu. There were several
cases and a few deaths. When
news of the deaths reached
Pearl City a public meeting
was held and it was the unan.
imous opinion of those at-
tending it that, at all hazards,
the disease must be kept out
of Pearl City. For this Or-
pose, it was decided to en-
force a rigid quarantine
against Honolulu.
We notified the Honolulu
Board of Health regarding
our proposed quarantine and,
at
the
same time,
requested
them to send us a generous
supply of preventative and
curative remedies. In the
meantime, preparations for
starting the quarantine were
rushed to completion. Two
sentry-boxes were built; one
of them was placed upon Red
Hill, the other one alongside
the railroad track—the only
accessible
roads from Hono-
noluht to Pearl City.
A
col-
ored man and a Hawaiian
were chosen as the first two
sentries — spearheads of the
quarantine. They were given
guns ad strict orders to al-
low no one to pass the line
of their sentry.boxes.
The sentinel
at
Red Hill
took his orders very seriously
and carried them out without
reservations. He held his post
like the Roman of old held
the bridge; his motto was:
"They
shall not
pass."
A
horse and buggy
with an
elderly driver came along.
With gun
on arm the
colored
sentry stepped in front of it
and, without parley. ordered
the driver to stop and turn
hack to town. The driver—an
oLd
kamaaina and prominent
citizen — protested. He was
only going to his ranch, which
was outside any boundary
of
quarantine. To further corn-
elicate matters, the guard
happened to be one of the
buggy driver's employees and
he
should have been working
on his employer's ranch in-
stead
of playing soldier on
Red Hill.
Holding .up railroad trains
ith mail and passengers was
not at all the sintple thing
that
we
had anticipated it
AR00010395

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HONOLULU
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8 - 6Et1
2
LOCH VIEW
48
O,j1t RAI LI
The Pearl City Peninsula "Dummys"
?
And OR&L Builds a Cemetery.
• •
For eons horses had been Man's primary motive and
muscle power, both as work animal and swift, agile transit.
But steam--and internal combustion—engines replaced
the horse for nearly every task. And when this new-fangled,
noisy technology began to share city streets and country
roads with horses, it was a time of terror for the animals.
Steam locomotives hissed and chuffed, stacks spewing
sparks and smoke, and myriad moving rods and levers and
cams offering a cacaphony of clanking and screeching, as
horses reared and whinnied and bolted.
A popular solution was to camouflage the locomotive
as a passenger coach, by building a
faux
wooden car body
around it. This creation was called a "dummy," and the
smokestack poking through the roof was the primary clue
that it was different than the cars pulled behind it. Big
cities were not the only ones to have a steam dummy.
Pearl City Peninsula had one as well! In an era before
"horseless carriages," Penisula residents had horses and
carriages, perhaps purchased from another Dillingham
enterprise, Hawaiian Carriage Manufacturing Company.
OR&L ran a 1.1 mile branch line down to the foot
of the peninsula, and originally used
Kauila
to shuttle
passengers back-and-forth to the Pearl City Station up
Above:
OR&L's steam dummy at Pearl City Station.
on the mainline. In 1903 Oahu Railway purchased a used
dummy from San Francisco, and issued it No. 5. In later
years, the coach body may have been stripped off.
In 1920 OR&L modified a Model TT Ford chassis,
its coachwork built by the skilled carpenters in the line's
own shops (below). The one-ton TT was far sturdier than
the Model T Ford upon which it was based. Its frame was
two-feet longer, and a worm-gear transmission replaced
the planetary one on the Model T automobile.
It overlooked the lochs of Pearl Harbor and was
called Loch View, although its permanent residents were
unlikely to be viewing anything. The cemetery was on a
plot of ground carved from the railroad's Remond Grove,
and was divided into blocks by religion as was the custom
of the day. It still exists, though there have been no burials
there for some 70 years, and it is unkempt.
Opened in 1900, burials began immediately, and the
railway company pursued them aggressively. They
solicited the government, offering a complete burial
package for the indigent, including opening and closing
the grave and use of the "funeral car" from the depot at
Iwilei all the way to the cemetery All for a flat fee of $10.
OR&Ls "funeral cars" are an interesting note and are
listed in their rolling stock inventory as follows:
1900 ... 1 • 1901 ... 2 • 1902 ... 2
1903 ...
2 • 1904 ... 2 • 1905 ... I
By 1906 there was never another mention of special
funeral cars and no images have been located that
positively identify these cars. This is strictly conjecture,
but as the two funeral cars—barely six years old and
presumably lightly used—disappeared from OR&I's
annual roster, two "combination coaches" suddenly
appeared for the first time. Since funeral cars were
designed with both a space for passengers and a small
space for "cargo," perhaps these were converted in
OR&I's shops.
And the deceased had a ticket, too!
O. R.
8c
L. CO.
HONOLULU
TO ?
oto
LOCH VIEW GO
2
The story of OR&L opening a cemetery in Pearl
City might have gone unnoticed were it not for a lucky
find in the Bishop Museum Archives. Within the OR&L
files, there was an assortment of paper ephemera –passes,
timetables and tickets. While sifting through them all to
cross-reference stations and whistle-stops over the years,
tickets for Loch View appeared.
The name was unfamiliar, though it seemed likely
to have been on a hillside above Pearl Harbor, as those
were the only "lochs" along the OR&L line. One of the
Loch View tickets was over-printed CORPSE, and
suddenly it all made sense. That discovery also explained
the mysterious "funeral cars" which were on OR&I's
roster in the early days of the century.
These special cars were often mentioned in obituaries
of the era. When prominent newspaperman W. Horace
Wright washed a "big dose of Carbolic Acid" down with
cognac on December 31, 1900, he became an early
interree at Loch View.
Under the bold headline:
KINDLY LAID AWAY
in the January 3, 1901
Evening Bulletin,
the story begins:
"All that remained of William Horace Wright, lawyer
and writer, was consigned to mother earth at Remond
Grove cemetery yesterday afternoon. The funeral was in
carriages from E.A. Williams' undertaking parlors to the
railway station, thence in the funeral car by rail."
49
Below:
Did ORthE perhaps designate this combination
coach in their roster as a finieral car serving Loch View?
This configuration-1/3 baggage and 2/3 passengers—
might otherwise be called a Freight 6- Smoking car, but
there is no such category in OR&L's annual roster.
'; j ?
II I Oki
AR00010396

THE OAHU RAILROAD.
For the ptoa
week
or
so
the I
hliot
railroad has been at is standstill
ho
far as the actual laying
of tle4
and
rails are concerned. During that
period attention has been given to
the ballasting
of
the track already
laid, about eight and a half miles in
length, and to bridging
acres%
marshy places for additional track.
These operations have
occupied
large forcea of men, and have been
pushed with vigor. The bridging is
completed quite a distance in ad-
vance of the track. The laying of
ties and rails was roamed yesterday
afternoon, and k now proceeding
rapidly. There k every probability
that the
Ewa courthotke will be
reached, or nearly
40,
by the 16th
instant.
An exenrsion train ran down to
the pre4ent terminus yesterday afte:-
noon, taking a party of lattice; and
gentlemen,
all
of whom were de-
lighted with the trip.
ills-
hie!,
amt.
0
4
un,
sill
'bite
Men
berg
to-
, V.
oak'.
;
Ash-
nter
lick-
sets-
it ml
Net t
srge
II de
Mrs.
prve
first
May
ham
1b
All
port
thal
son:
said
accr
It
As.
Die
Daily Bulletin
November
8, 1889
Proper ballast is a critical element in the ride of a
train. It was a track section gang's responsibility to
keep ballast ftom becoming packed down.
our
ale&
hite
Bon
lily"
esty
iii-
tper
It. to
Wipe
ning
slily
tbe
inks
Oahu, aged 57 yettr.
STEAMER MOVEMENTS.
There
will be three steamers from
San Francisco this month, the
Oceanic due on the 17th, the Aus-
tralia on the 20th, and the Zealandia
ea the 28th. The steamers leaving
Honolulu for San Francisco will be
the Alameda on the 21st and the
Australia on the 27th.
BIDS FOR THE STATION.
In last issue it was stated that F.
Harrison had received the contract
for building the Oahu Railway Sta-
tion at the terminus. The tenders
opened were as follows: R. J.
Greene, $2350; G. W. Lincoln,
$1899; 0-. Lucas, $1820; a China-
man, $1625; J. Ouderkirk, $1392:
F. Harrison, $1125.
1111111ARCIte
Con
Nat
inc
an3
poi
tea
the
Le3
ACH
3
13.
da
of
sel
cli
be
Be
7•117,
-
-•-•-
11.1
.
0r.rfit
?
.....
?
{-All ft
edition
has !wen printed.
Be
sure
a
nd
s
on('
A copy eu
the City of Peking
next week
to your
friends abroad.
A
irAncr.
party went on
A
railway
exenrsion to the end
of
the
tr
u
ck b
e
-
yond Moanalua oii ilia invitation of
Mr. 11.
F. Dillingham
this afternoon.
The object is a trial of the new cars,
and, if everything works well without
"hot boxes," it is probable that a
moonlight picnic party
will take a
special train to
Moanalua this even-
ing.
,..
■■■
■■
••
Worn: on Mr. A. L. Smith's new
building on Fort street, is somewhat
drlayed on account of waiting for
bricks. Mr. Harrison the contractor
has several thousan4 on the Ny. S.
Ilo
wne Which. sal
be
nuulojled in.
Corn missio
Port ugueSt
Canavarro
nese Const
guet, Fren
W. Mist, I
F. A. Sell
Mr. H. F.
ninny, and
Macfarlan
and Mr.
Chain beds
ant Chines
C. Afong,
Revs. C. 3
and others
No littl
pears to
traosporia
pastor.
tologieal
a
a coin-
Ore into
i.
'rhe
rem and
'US pas-
service
Lion
WAS
Reports
Church.
:es. Dr.
sses of
its were
tress of
The
as call-
z-a
V
,
his
sndon.
is for
r
mu-
:ciated
The
'ovem-
g is a
fnung,
sent in
1.
isseau
a re-
.
Geo.
sseau,
I with
stands
ntends
recep-
easant
e Club
ictental
lerved.
Ma-
Mr. J.
I
t. H.
A. S.
.Kawa-
11
;
s
gia
E
d
I
e,
Honor
lay and
Els.=
parcels by the pa,rcel post.
11 a. m.—Letter and paper mail.
OAHU RAILWAY STOCK.
There arrived on the barkentine
W. IL Dimond this morning for the
Oahu Railway Co. two first-class lo-
comotives with all the latest im-
provements and Westinghouse air
brakes. They were made at the
Baldwin Locomotive Works, Phila-
delphia. Also, a smoking car and
a second-class passenger car. The
schooner W. S. Bowne, about due
from San Francisco, has two
first-
class cars on board.
BIG OPIUM SEIZURE.
There arrived among the freWit
.
on the Australia from San Fran-
Cisco seven barrels marked diamond
H. H. They were supposed to con-
tain shrimps. Mr. Turrill,
the Port
Surveyor, and his assistant, Mr.
John Good, keo,t a fatherly eye
on
these barrels. The end of pne was
opened and shrimps found to a
depth of two inches and then opium.
The. vessel has discharged and
no
one
has called for the barrels. They
are now in the Customs warehouse
and will be opened this afternoon.
Mr. Turrill thinks they contain
aver a thousand tins of opium.
BOOKED TO LEAVE.
patch co
Samoan al
letter of
preciation
to his co
the head
own, is a
and show
liticat
in
Union di
Secretary
the appo
says he
say that
tracts frr
has been
and zeal
ties of 3
conclude
that Mr.
his post
and with
personal
The In
has not
the repu'
hostess,
modesty,
all kinds
to Honol,
naturally,
gards of
her as a
present
lar,ge
ph
which 11(
accompat
note:
AN EXCURSION BY RAIL.
Yesterday evoning about six
n'eloek a party of Hill ty
or forty b-
ait-% and gentlemen, accompanied
hy Mr. B. F. Dillingham, boarded
an excursion train at the city ter-
minus of the Oahu Railway. They
were equipped with picnic baskets
and the train steamed down to the
farthest point, of the completed road
near Moanaitta. Thence the party
walked on a% far a,- the !Ion. S.
l.
1).nnon's grass cottage, where
tables
and chair.,
WCIT
produced and the
basket
,
. unpaeked. A very plea-
sant cr•ning was spent and at nine
o'clock the party started home in
the train, reaching town about half
an hour later, all thoroughly cle-
lighted with the excursion. The
cara were considered especially com-
fortable, the upholstery Of plaited
bamboo being better adapted to the
climate than warm plush. Those
qualified to judge are of the opinion
that
the road is specially well con-
structed, having-
heavy sleepers
elose together
and being well bal-
lasted.
tt0 tal Anti
I.
upon sugar
Tilt' effect'
criminate ag
in favor of ./
1
ly reduce to
i sti ne Treat
pending hem
We belies'i
the Hawaiia
cleaver to sec
prodUcts
llf
Amenenn
bounties am
Tntuu:
limited in
her of Ann.
1
t i 1
i
t
t
I
c
t
.i
t
e
s
Q
aitn1
II
of filth. int
State.;
are
sugar, rice
los
s
'.
There
might be p
upon lands
for
product
the Treaty,
t hem.
If a mut
arrivad at is
either
.
?
count
_
tram-
!Nov
8 W,
.011111.
pro-
days
spose
I had
tither.
out,
he 1G8
a
ll
a
n
aiian
tl
:te-
al:tee
Ilia
II
Ex-
n
Ar-
'gust
great
Lions
Is, at
rend'
I the
iesty,
n the
f the
at
of
Ir. I
ly of
6
Daily Bulletin
November 14, 1889
News about free tickets for the King's Birthday Ride, plus
a billiards contest and a likely balloon ascension by
Professor Van Tassell on Saturday afternoon.
xtra! Extra! News of OR&L
The construction of Oahu Railway was big news in the
ly
days. Each nw arrival of locomotives, rolling stock or even
s was covered in the newspaper. Each advance in the track's
igth, each after-hours excursion, was fit to print. Frank
llingham was himself newsworthy, and the newspapers
derstood that this project would change 0`ahu forever.
These stories—some long, some just a sentence or two-
-
er a direct link to 0`ahu more than a century ago, a time
ken the economics of Big Sugar (and its barons and bankers)
beginning to cause the monarchy to wobble.
Daily Bulletin
September 5, 1889
Bids for the main depot at Iwilei ranged from
$2350 to less than half that, while `:1
Chinaman" did not even get his name in.
Daily Bulletin
October 4, 1889
Fach wheel's cast brass bearing had to be constantly lubricated
o friction did not cause it to melt and seize. The lubrication
vas by oily rags stuffed into the journal box. If the bearing got
oo hot, these rags would ignite, causing a "hot box." Hopefidly
he smoke alerted the train crew before the bearing seized.
Daily Bulletin
September 25, 1889
Several cars and the two Baldwin locomotives arrived in
Honolulu Harbor in plenty of time for ORthE's official
opening on November 16 Some shrimp arrived, too!
Daily Bulletin
October 4, 1889
An evening picnic excursion to the grass cottage at Samuel M
Damon's Moanalua estate.
I 2
1
s2
the vestry of the Centr.11
ke)'`. Church, commencing at
7
::to o'clock.
liges„ There will be a literary and musical
entertainment.
-....•.--
1'satsoN8 going to Pearl River on
the
excursion trains Saturday will
please bear in mind that they are to
return on the Fame train, ataying
at
lialawa only a few minutes.
?
*-61111.••
?
TICKETS
for the free ride on the
Oislitt Railway on Saturday, the
King's birthday, are now being dis-
tributed by Mr. Frank B. Auerbach,
at the office of J. E. Brown &Co.,
Merchant street. They will also be
distributed to-morrow between the
hours of 10 a. nt. and p. tn.
Ton interest in billiard circles is
centered in the contest. which is to
take place at,
the
Pantheon Billiard
Parlors to-morrow evening between
the well-knosvn experts Messrs.
Bowen and "[Owe. The former will
endeavor to play one thousand points
to the hater's seven hundred.
-
?
-
TIME
is every probability of a free
balloon aseesteion mid parachute
jump for the public on Saturday
afternoon, as the subscription list
which is being circulated is filling
up. ft.
is not.
yet decided at what
time it will take plitee, but arrange-
Monts will
he made whereby the
1, 7
1
11
,11e
.
will be notified one hour
Tim ateatoor Xenia
arristd this
______.__.l
morning from
os....
Kauai
?
somewhat
mill-
.
so
badly hurt that the ease
Was
ad-
journed
until Wednesday.
I --
THE OAHU RAILWAY.
Mr.
B. F. 1)illinghan3 prop
-
pies
to
give eitizens a chance for the last
time to have it frets ride on the Oahu
railway. On Saturday, the King's
birthday, trains will leave the
station, every hour front 7
a. m.
to
P
. In. The trains WM run as
fur as
l'ileGrew's
residence on Pearl
Harbor, remain there about ten
minutes
WA
then return to town.
Tickets will be issued at the office
of .1. I.:. Brown, Merchant street,
for cult train. l'arties
desiring to
go ilowtt will have to state to Mr.
Brown the train they intend
leaving
1111 EMI will
give them a ticket
marked for that hour. For exam-
ple, It person wants to leave on the
ten oleloek train, he will ask for
ii
ticket for that hour. Six ears will
attaelied to each train al111 there
will be
no •rg:want.
This genero-
sity on the part of 3fr. Dillingham
will no doubt be largely availed of
on that slay.
On
Monday the ititit, the lints
will
he opened for
110,4,1440,
three trains
running daily am follows: I.eave
station at 7:30 and 10 a.
In.,
anti :1
P. nt., returning
at U:30 a. in., 1.2
noon awl p. 'rho fares to the
opposite terminus
null bark will In.
Iirst • lass 5
144'01111 Class
rents,
third
"I MM', 50 yenta.
.41,1
41
A 0000 EXAMPLE.
sayN: '1'Thu
prim f4
twenty
1,
?
dollar,'
• L..

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offered
?
by MOIL
-
FRANK (IERT
Z,
Pacific Commercial Advertiser
ca. 1889
Interest
in the new
rail line ran so high that
a
local shoe store
converted
a
boot into
a steam
engine and ran the ad through
1889.
.111.
Damon ,31
L. A. 'I'l
tenor, Ili
torney-G
Hon. J.
I
Resident
C. B. d'.
sioner,
neS0 Con
Bickertm
Consul a
ance, U,
and 111 i
Bishop.
Irwin, LI
Gen, F.
J. S. NN'a
tosh, Mn
and Mrs
Booth,
Mrs. M
Gulick,
Mrs.
Se!
Capt. A.
II. B. M
officers
c
Alert an
McGrew
and Mrs
Mrs. J.
and Mrs
CO
The .
have arr
Johnson
pose to
the Haw
10..4
On
Pal
for
403
A
1
.10
Lita
a lilt
Daily Bulletin
November 13, 1889
Frank Dillingham's offer offtee tickets for the Opening
Day. The train, at this point, went nowhere
specia4
but on the 18th they were chargingfill fares.
AR00010397

!RT.
me of the
ay even'-
. Sauvlet
.Boieldleu
...Weber
Merit
of
a
le, and a
I.
J. W.
l'OW11,
D.
Campana
1 Rhodes.
.•.Ascher
sun Rhein
r.
...Sauvlet
ot Japan)
e McGrew
`ational-
.1iivrwsanlza
- 27; -2
7
27 77'1'7
2 . 171.7
THE DAILY
Pacific Commercial Advertiser.
Re just and fear not:
Let all the ends thou eines' at be
Thy Country's. tit) God's. and Truth's.
MONDAY,
?
NOV. Is, ictso.
Teen who accepted Mr. Dillui;.z.
bsm'a
invitation to rid.. uver hi-..lew
railway to Pearl River, Saturday.-
and they numbered several tho.1
sands—appear to have enjoyed 11.0
novelty very
much.
Not a hitch or
an accident
occurred during the day.
though trains rail frotu either ter.
minus
every two hours, aud each
train
of six or seven cars was crowd-
ed to its
utmost capacity. The road
is nearly level, and is only three or
fonr feet above tide water. In fact
the tract runs close along
or over
the marshes, fishponds and lagoons,
and the scenery that opens to the
view of passengers is in some places
really charming. The last two miles
of the road lie along the shore of
Pearl River lagoons,
and this will
continue on through Ewa, and the
stretch of three or four miles be-
yond the village. The land
near
and above the railroad, through its
entire length, is probably capable of
being irrigated with artesian wells,
and thus brought under cultivation,
for bananas, rice or fruit
trees.
If
this prove to be the case, it will not
be long before the entire route is
Ailed up with settlers, who will raise
produce and hay° a sure and speedy
conveyance to market.
The sad
termination of the bal-
loon aseension on Saturday after-
noon
.
fe•
IWO
met
a gloom over what
war that tile work will probably be necom-
plished by an English eumpany.
The work of unloading Om tu ly
arri veil* cars, for the Oahu Railway Co.,
from the vessel, and the rapid and safe
transportation across the city, to the
railroad station, reflects very creditably
on Mr. Ouderkirk's mechanical skill and
judgment.
One of the many sufferers by the Se-
attle fire has arrived in Honolulu and
intends to go into buoiness here. Ile
states that he is
already acclimated, the
heat of the momorab)o fire at &aide
haying relieved all fear of Who° or other
local fevers incidental to new comers.
The general public will have the op:
portunity olrered them on Thanksgivimi
day, hv I he enterprise of Manager Dil-
lingham, to travel, by means of the Oahe
Railway, far from the
dust
and turmoil
of Ilie illy to the grassy, ilesteefill pre-
cincts of htlawa and adjacent stations.
Special rat ,
n; are acIverlisml in (Iasi:ogle.
Two boxes of dynamite %%ere very
unceremoniously jolted out
of one of the
American Co.'s wagons, at the corner of
I.ort and queen streets, yesterday after-
110011 DM. Of I he
boxes landing with
As
a
the foi
of the
article
eke() a
Col.
A
eineau
$15,001
the At
lutterc
result
"Dit
time he
"Co
$o we
drAws
the r
Orleal
SOH all
tIrtol
us to I,
won 41
the pu
ethertt
.
nem to
nih-
'Ohl-
IO
pike
los-
'I itt-
tp
ltt
the
airy
hot,
per-
One
ent
of
.11s.
lily
ret i -
bIg
cattle on moloaru, winch will lead the
Board to advertise for a supply.
-
This is the last week of Sachs'
mammoth clearance sale and the last
chance for big bargains. Those who
have not yet taken advantage of the
sale, should not delay in calling and
see the bargains that are offered.
y•- ?
THE
rails of the Oahu railroad are
being rapidly laid. Between noon of
Thursday and the noon of Saturday
last, over one mile of ties and rails
was placed in position under the per-
sonal supervision of Mr. B. F. Dil-
lingham.
IT was the intention to have started
the house electric lights SaturOay
night, but the box covering the water
wheel leaked, causing a postpone-
ment. Repairs
a
ro being made and
it is probable that everything will be
in working order by Tuesday night.
THE
Blue Ribbon League had a
very gobd entertainment at the Y.
alai
there certai
ring 30 or
match with
17 years
Nov. 11,
POLICE (
Fifteen
usual amou
Kaula
spirituous 1
on Sunday
pleaded get
offense,ask
He was fin(
Kaki pl
of assault ;
officer, in t
to wit, a
fined him $
prisonment
Ah Long
ing opium
Remanded
ITusemtur,
mon
NEW
r e.
sted
roots
or of
ried
titer
Ani-
1
Ma
purpose ot diabibitleg theta
on the
Omit.
The Oahu Railway Oen new
locomotive Lanakila with tender.
weighing twenty-two and a halt taw
was placed
on thew mew
morning, taken
mess Oar=
and placed on
the track without a
hitch of any kind . By next Taw
son's
day the
plantation
traekwm
and
b•laid
the
to=
lIt
will be shipped free oar to ship.*
purl
Afty-
Jo
r
Wini
o z
to.
Daily Bulletin
January 30, 1890
T 4.4414 ,4,-,4.,pc
P.
C. Advertiser
November 18, 1889
The
Adveriser
's review of OR&L's Opening Day
festivities is rather staid, noting that the "view of
passengers in some places is really charming"
The somewhat offhand remark that the land
around the line might be irrigated proved true.
Daily Bulletin
November 11, 1889
It is a week before the Grand Opening, and Dillingham is out
on the line personally supervising the rapid laying of a mile of
track in two days.
P. C. Advertiser
November 26, 1889
As new cars arrive from Carter in Califbrnia,
Frank Dillingham is advertising Thanksgiving
Day specials on the railway.
rLU, U. L, NOVEMBER 15, 1
' FIRST BUSINESS ON THE OAHU
RAILWAY.
The BULLETIN
has secured the
honor of the first paid passenger
ticket issued by the Oahu Railway
and Land Company. It is first-class
for the round trip, llonolulu to Ha.
laws, Pearl River Division, dated
November 18.1889, and
was bought
by
Mr. Wray Taylor on behalf
of
the DAILY BULLETIN.
The first way hill for freight has
been
Issued to Mr. W. D. M.
Wayne, being for forty bunches of
bananas.
kid
*cr.
lo
• hi
n.lta
3t
at
by
the
Ii-
the
dly
ce
r-
I.
o-
de
ff.
fa-
ob-
er,.
ited
lbw
ought to hate theta Weak it'd by
law.
RAILWAY AND STEAMBOAT
EX-
CURSION.
The Spit excursion by the ththn
railway in a business way will take
place on Saturday afternoon of this
week. It wilt extend, in the ease
of those paying therefor, to a trip
over the waters of Pearl Harbor in
the steamer Ewa. There will he
twenty miles on the cars and twenty
on boat for the full excursion; the
number of tickets being limited to
the comfortable rapacity of
the
boat-160. Tickets will be issued,
however, for the round trip by rail
only, in addition to those covering
the steamer excursion. If neces-
sary two trains will leave the city
station, the time of departure being
1:15 p. tn.
i
and there will be
no
Mopping along the line. Returning,
the excursion train will leave Halawa
at 5:13, giving good time for reach-
ing town before dark. The fare for
train and boat combined is $2.50
the round journey ; for the cars
alone fares are $1, 75c. and 50e.
first, second and third class respec-
tively. Tiekets for the excursion
niust he bought at the station on
Friday and will be good only for the
excursion trains on the time given.
The steamer will bare the Hawaiian
Quintet Club on board. This will
be a tine opportunity for a sail on
the smooth water of the Pearl Har-
bor loelas, taking in a great reaell
of beautiful seenery, without the
terrors of easiekness endured by
voyagers to Pearl Harbor by sea.
The trip by tail alone git
ef.
an op-
portunity of seeing the country nud
holding pienies on the shore of the
harbor, as them is a stay of three
hours and a half at Ilninwa for the
excursioniste.
of th
e'eto
Dielt
said
have
mina
final,
flied f
Cleril
ry
3
tt
,1
ceel
tice
set
Ills
As
J U I./

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, op
Ah
Boo
GRAND EXCURSION
714T
'sl,
by
ng
D.
ed
m
te l
rt.
Ia-
lb.
is
tie
ier
of
II-
is
ha
th
is
Or
OU
Fe
Daily Bulletin
November 15, 1889
Daily Bulletin
November 19, 1889
Likely the first excursion "package" in Hawari!
year on ms way from China to San
Francisco.
A atm: on the early train is very
refreshing these mornings. The train
leaves at 7 :30 and returns at 9 :30. A
gentleman who has taken the trip
two mornings in
succession speaks in
enthusiastic terms of the invigorat-
ing effects.
TICKETS
for the excursion by the
Oahu railway, on Saturday
next,
will
be issued to children under 12 years
of age at half price. It may be added
that the regular charge
for children
of the age unheated, on any train
and any day, is one half that of
adults.
- —
••
■■
-
• - ?
-
BETWEEN
the hours of 1:30 and 3
c'elock to-morrow
afternoon
LIN WO-
Daily Bulletin
November 20, 1889
TO

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Ewa Courthouse!
(Manses)
On New Year's Day, Jan, i s '90
•■■••
■■
•••
P(IPILAII RATES:
1st class round
trip.. ?
$1 to
2nd class round trip ?
Trains leave Honolulu 8.00 a. m.,
10.30 a. m:, 1 :00
2.:D0
nalua
8:12 a. m., 10:42
a. ma., 2 :23 p. m.,
3:12 p.
m.; Puuloa (Mficial:mem)
8:23
a.
m., 10:03 a. m., 1:23 p.
113.,
3:23
p. m.; Ilalawa 8:30 a. m., U :00 a. m.,
:30 p.
TU., 3
30 p. m.; &lea
(McGrew's)
8:36 a. m., 11 :06 a. m., 1%30 p. tn., 3:16
p.
m. ; Waiau Aki's) 8:18 a. re., 11:13
a. in., 1 :43 p. m., 3:42
r. m. ; arrive
at
Mamma (Courthouse) 8
:48 ma. m., II :18
a. m., 1 :48
r.
m., 8:48 p. tn.
Trains learn Mariana (Courthouvf)
9:25 a. in., 12:00 in, 2:30 p. tn., 4:10
p. tn.; Wallin 11:30 n. ru„ 12:05
p Ui.,
2$5
r. In., 4:11 p. tn.; A.ten
(ftiCUreveN) 9:37
a. tit,, 12:12 n. nt., 2:42
p. Th., 4 :22 p 111.; ilnItivist
s : 43
12:18 p. m., 2.48 p. at , 4 :28 p. to.4.
Putting' (MacfarInne's1 9:30 n. tn., 12:23
P. tn., 2:65 p. m. 4 ::15 It. In.: 11tounsilita
111:01 a.
in., 12:36 p. in., 3:011 p. m.,
4:16 p. nt.:
arrive at Honolulu to:14
a. m.,
12:45 p. m., 3:18
r. In..
p. m.
------- — ?
- - ?
441 11

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BREW Co. No. 1.
T
HE regular monthly meeting of
thln
Commute is oimooncti
until WM13 -
Daily Bulletin
December 31, 1889
A New Year's Day Excursion to Ewa Courthouse.
Stations are still designated by who lives nearby!
I 1 of
f 1886.
Hines
e here-
es for
), will
ace of
In the
inpaid
1 , due
111 10
.
please
Ice of
Ittaiwa
• ret ion
se will
Irks.
.134 IS
fin
a
rty,
AR00010398

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COMM MCI A.L ADVERTISER
NOVEMBER 25, 1889.
twin adduced
defendants
4,
1
parlis
• old
filly
!:10k
.
at the
110CIRCO OH
the world's
') seconds.
he former
If the Hen-
mo('red a
now Coast
nor of Mend
Ito owner of
• The price
0,000.
tterday the
I) was an in-
unknown in
$ name will
th, for Peter
, of the club,
ictory at the
t., defeating
h champion,
ctators were
at
seeing no
-tlinod at first
R eonqneror,
ackson wins
ins an equal
ight's work,
.ation among
at hitter and
the world.
ELAYED.
, or St
Cows Line
-oident.
'me morning
of
rum discovered
of the steamer
4 Folsom oltwk
investigation
' lime stored in
ieen in some
led by water,
o boil, crest-
might. Tema
or
taking
the
raven!, as far
Ain King mig-
Alert, which
lumping NOV.
0119 vessel's
parent effect
boiling of the
I. and A. It.
by Mr. Hug,
h the tug Re-
law the vessel
.1 Vigilant and
tiring the
lie-
.imti to the 10 j5.
run into mud
Jf the lime can
at once be cons-
cargo of march-
*ere will be little
loan.
HAW
°PP. SP r ''

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Hardl

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HOUS
PaintS,
Powder,
HIt
Hilver-plat
Plows, P1
Handles o
Plantai
Hart's I
moi
Manila an.
Wire home
14prinider
Union Meta
" New
Electioll of Engineers

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FOlt 1890-01.
Notice Is hereby given that the first
bi-
ennial election (under Chapter 45 Manta
Laws of OM) will he held
MC-
P);
oiter
leg,
tim-
nn
I
tam
ttil
lb'.
!lova
IS it
ergs,
11 all
Italy
earn
11 Si
psi°
iE
ntll-
resporl
V EN.
'Mina
twiny
People's Excursion
0. R.
1.?5 L. CO.
A
Special Excursion Train will be ran
To Ewa Plantation!
ON SATURDAY, SEPT. 13th
014
.
11 1"1
50 Cents to Pearl City and Return.
75 Cents ta Ewa Plantation and
Return.
An opportunity for a delightful ride
and a breath of pore air, for only two
cents per mile.
REMEMBER THE TIME
gifirA
quarter after one o'clock
P. N.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER
13th.

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61-7 ammismiam il
Leaving the Honolulu Depot at 1.45 P.I.
Making only one stop each way at Pearl
City; returning to Honolulu
at 5:15 p. x.
The Train will be made up of Coaches
and Canopy top Cars all one price.
minden Rates for this Train
Joseph Hyniarrfrom the
11YM A 1•I
U MT in
ktREI.
Honolulu. May
80. 1B
90 - ?
.1213.414
TORANNER
St
Andrew's Cathedral Sunday. School
t
nry